Brockley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Brockley Family Coat of Arms

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Brockley Coat of Arms Meaning

Brockley Name Origin & History

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Brockley Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Brockley blazon are the chief and chequy. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, or and vert .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The chief is an area across the top of the field 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It appears in many different forms and can itself be charged with other charges and ordinaries, 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief, being treated almost as if it were a completely separate area. In its simplest form it can be clearly identified. Early examples include the award by Henry III of England to the knight Robert de MORTEYN BRETON of Ermine, a chief gules.

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Brockley Name

Brockley Origin:

England

Origins of Brockley:

It is an English geographical surname. It acquires from the hamlet of Brockley, a place near Bury St Edmunds. The name was originally given to the king of the palace of Brockley, and it is possible that all the later named ancestors come from this same Peter de Brokely. The name means “the cleared lands by the waterside,” from the pre 7th century Olde English “broc-legh.” The term “broc” did not always mean a Stream or small river, but could also be used to describe a lake or fen, quite similar in this example. The surname was well noted in the early records of the East Anglia region and especially in the division of Norfolk, although boundaries have changed over the centuries, and this may be misleading. Early examples derived from actual charters contained as Lescilina de Brokeley, a lady landowner in Norfolk about the year 1250, William de Brokkeley, the rector of Howe, also in Norfolk, in 1325, and John Brocklee, another minister, this time of North Lynn, Norfolk, in the year 1420. Clearly, early Brockley’s had a close connection to the parish. The earliest known recording is that of Peter de Brokely, who may have been the brother of Lescilina de Brokely. He was noted in the land records of Norfolk for the years 1227 to 1239. It was in the time of King Henry 111, 1216 – 1272.

Variations:

More common variations are: Brockly, Brockle, Brocley, Brokley, Brckley, Brackly, Brickley, Brookley, Barckley, Birckley.

England:

The origins of the surname Brockley appeared in Suffolk where people held a family seat from early times. Some say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Brockley is a region and an electoral ward of south London, England, in the London District of Lewisham 5 miles (8 km) southeast of Charing Cross.

Brockley is a hamlet and civil church in Somerset, England. The church is within the Unitary authority of North Somerset, about 3 miles (4.8 km) south of Nailsea, and contains the hamlet of Chelvey.

Brockley (also known as Brockley Green) is a local church in the St Edmundsbury district of Suffolk, England. According to the 2001 poll, it had a population of 281 increasing to 312 at the 2011 Census. It is situated around 7 miles (11 km) south of Bury St Edmunds and 9 miles (14 km) north of Sudbury on the B1066.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Brockley had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the surname Brockley who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Samuel Brockley, who came to Virginia in 1702. Catherine Brockley who sailed to America in 1743. Thomas Brockley came to America in 1752.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Brockley who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Frederick Brockley arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Andromache” in 1850.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Brockley: England 269; United States 266; Australia 134; Canada 64; New Zealand 7; Zimbabwe 5; Belgium 1; Tanzania 1; India 1.

Brockley Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Lord Mayor of London, 1433). Chequy or and vert, a chief ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100