Brotherton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Brotherton Family Coat of Arms

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Brotherton Coat of Arms Meaning

Brotherton Name Origin & History

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Brotherton Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Brotherton blazon are the lion, label and club. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and gules.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 10A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The label holds a special place in heraldry, originlly being a temporary mark, used by the oldest son while his father was still alive. In appearance it is a horizontal bar near the top of the shield from which descend 3 or 5 “points” or small rectangles descending from the bar. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label In more recent use it has come to used as charge in its own right 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154 and may have additional charges on each point, which can create a pleasing visual effect.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The club is more often found on the shoulder of a savage or wild-man than on the shield as a separate charge and is represented as we expect, in the form of a heavy, knobbly branch.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Brotherton Name

Brotherton Origin

England

Origin of Brotherton:

It is a well-known ancient locational surname from a nearby village of Pontefract in Yorkshire. The village is listed in the early part of 1030 as ‘Broodertun’, and the name of the village is defined as meaning ‘The brother’s field.’ If this represents a field inherited by an individual called ‘Brother’, or if it represents such a place worked or created by ‘brothers’ from a spiritual order is unclear. Early documents include recorded names such as Thomas de Brotherton (1300 – 1338), the first-born son by the second wife of King Edward I. This Thomas de Brotherton was an organized leader of Norfolk and Marshall of England by the age of 18. He was promoted to warden of England at nineteen when his brother Edward II attempted to attack Scotland in 1319. Other recordings of the name include Ricardus and Walterus de Brotherton in the Poll Tax Rolls of Yorkshire in the year 1379. Later documentation is that of Michael Brotherton, who married Joanna Price in 1624 in London, and Sir Thomas Brotherton, who was chosen as aide-de-camp to King William IV in 1830.

Variations:

Some common variations are: Brothertn, Brotheraton, Brothewrton, Brothrton, Bretherton, Bratherton, Brothertan, Bortherton, Brotherten, Brotharton.

England:

The surname Brotherton originated in North Yorkshire at Brotherton, a village and civil church in the Selby region in 1030. The village is the mother town of Thomas of Brotherton, 1st Lord of Norfolk, King Marshall (1300-1338), fifth son of Edward I of England and Margaret of France and a half-brother of Edward II.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Alexander de Brotherton, dated 1273. It was during the time of King Edward I who was known to be ‘The Hammer of the Scots’. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Brotherton settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Brotherton who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Dennis Brotherton and Hester Brotherton at the age of 18, who landed in Virginia in 1635. Hen Brotherton and Henry Brotherton settled in Virginia in 1637. Edward Brotherton landed in Maryland in 1678.

Some of the people with the name Brotherton who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Brotherton who settled in Maryland in 1775 in the 18th Century.

Some of the people with the name Brotherton who settled in the United States in the 19th century included George Brotherton at the age of 27, arrived in New York in 1812 in the 19th Century.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Brotherton who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Mr. Alexander Brotherton who settled in Canada in 1783 in the 19th Century.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Brotherton who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Benj. Brotherton, an English prisoner from Lancaster, who was migrated aboard the ship “Almorah” on April 1817, settling in New South Wales, Australia. Thomas Brotherton, an English prisoner from Lancaster, who was aboard the “Albion” in May 1828, also coming to New South Wales, Australia. Edward Brotherton who was an English prisoner from Gloucester, who was transported aboard the “Adelaide” in August 1849, arrived in Van Diemen’s Land and Port Phillip, Australia. William Brotherton at the age of 18 arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship ‘Omega.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Brotherton who settled in New-Zealand in the 19th century included James A. Brotherton at the age of 21, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “La Hogue” in 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Brotherton: United States 5,892; England 1,968; Scotland 144; Australia 553; Germany 134; Canada 190; South Africa 584; Wales 79; France 73; Switzerland 54.

Notable people:

Edward Brotherton, 1st Baron Brotherton was an English businessman and politician.

Helen Brotherton was an English environmentalist.

John Brotherton was an American artist.

Joseph Brotherton was an English politician.

Michael Brotherton was a British reporter and politician.

Thomas William Brotherton was a British Army commander.

Thomas of Brotherton was the 1st leader of Norfolk.

Brotherton Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Gules three lions pass, guard, or, a label of five (another, three) points argent. Crest—A hand holding a club in pale proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
10. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89