Brough Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Brough Family Coat of Arms

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Brough Coat of Arms Meaning

Brough Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Brough. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Brough Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Brough blazon are the swan, saltire and cross. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, gules and or .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Wade suggests that the appearance of a swan in a coat of arms is perhaps an indication of a musical person, or a “ lover of poetry and harmony”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78 It is generally shown in a lifelike aspect and colouring, although it may be leaked and legged with other colours. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan. It is a popular charge, both on the shield itself and impress, sometimes sitting and sometimes rising as if about to take off in flight. 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245

The saltire is one the major ordinaries, large charges that occupy the whole of the field 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire. Arguably one of the best uses of this device is that of the St. Andrews Cross, a white saltire on a blue background found on the Scottish flag. The saltire is obviously closely related to the Cross, and Wade in his work on Heraldic Symbology suggests additionally that it alludes to “Resolution”, whilst Guillim, an even more ancient writer, somewhat fancifully argues that it is awarded to those who have succesfully scaled the walls of towns! 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. In its basic form, the cross is created from two broad bands of colour at right angles covering the whole extent of the shield. It has been subject to all manner of embellishment, and the interested reader is referred to the references, especially Parker’s Heraldic dictionary for many examples of these. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross 17A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P106 18A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P160-173 Suffice it to say that any armiger would be proud to have such an important device as part of their arms.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Brough Name

Brough Origin:

England

Origins of Brough:

The origin of this interesting name originally evolves from Anglo-Saxon and is a regional name from any one of the different areas so named, of which there are many in Yorkshire and Derbyshire, and other areas, acquiring from the Olde English pre 7th Century “burh” which means “castle, fort.” In most situations, these are the areas of a Roman reinforcement. The name was widely interpreted, but ultimately appeared in Staffordshire, where the pronunciation is frequently “braf.” The surname sometimes dates back to the early 13th Century. More recordings appear such as one William de Brugh (1275) in the Hundred Rolls of Norfolk. Differentiation in the phrase of the spelling forms of the surname consists of Broghe, Broughe, Brouf, Bruff, and Broffe. Robert Brough named in November 1559, at St. Vedast Foster Lane and St. Michael le Querne, London and Phillipp Broughe, son of Robert named in September 1565, at St. Martin Ludgate, Staffordshire. One G. Brough, a famine traveler, moved from Liverpool aboard the “Adam-Lodge” destined for New York in June 1847.

Variations:

More common variations are: Broughy, Brugh, Brogh, Brouh, Broughay, Broughey, Broughue, Berhough, Barugh, Braugh.

England:

The origins of the surname Brough was found in Orkneys where people held a family seat from early times.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Daniel de Buag, dated about 1219, as a witness in the “Assize Rolls of Yorkshire.” It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Brough had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Brough settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Brough who settled in the United States in the 17th century included William Brough landed in Maryland in 1636. Thomas Brough arrived in Virginia in 1637. Edward Brough also landed in Virginia in 1642. Andrew Brough arrived in Maryland in 1659. James Brough settled in Jamaica in 1685.

Some of the people with the surname Brough who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Heronimus Brough and Heronimus Brough at the age of 21; both arrive in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the same year 1743. George Brough came in Savannah, Georgia in 1774, with his wife Barbara, three sons and a daughter. George Brough at the age of 35 settled in Savannah, Georgia in 1774.

The following century saw many more Brough surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Brough who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Mr. Brough at the age of 45 and Mrs. Brough at the age of 35; both arrived in Mobile, Ala in the same year 1850. John Brough landed in New York in 1819. Charles Brough arrived in Allegany Division, Pennsylvania in 1873.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Brough who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William Brough, an English prisoner from Staffordshire, who shifted aboard the ship “America” in April 1829, coming in New South Wales, Australia. John Brough who also an English prisoner from Lancaster aboard the ship “Anson” arrived in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia respectively in the year 1843.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Brough: United States 3,914; England 4,415; Australia 1,142; Canada 886; South Africa 1,142; Scotland 597; Wales 147; Germany 168; New-Zealand 755; Hong Kong 83.

Notable People:

Alexander Brough (1863–1940), was a New York leader.

Andrew Brough was a New Zealand singer.

Arthur Brough (1905–1978), was an English artist.

Charles Hillman Brough (1876–1935), was an American congressman.

Clayton Brough (born 1950), was an American television weatherman.

David Brough (born 1962), was a British scholar.

Jim Brough was a British rugby football player.

John Brough (1811–1865), was an American leader.

John Brough (footballer) (born 1973), was an English football player.

Louise Brough (1923–2014), was an American player in tennis.

Mal Brough (born 1961), was an Australian leader.

Michael Brough (born 1981), was an English football player.

Monte James Brough (1939–2011), was a LDS parish leader.

Brough Family Gift Ideas

Browse Brough family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Windy-yates, Leek). Ar. on a saltire sa. five swans of the first. Crest—A swan ppr.
2) (Ireland). Or, a cross gu.
3) (Lincolnshire). Az. three fleurs-de-lis erm. within a bordure or. Crest—A lion sejant collared and lined or.
4) (Scotland). Az. a fesse betw. three fleurs-de-lis or. Crest—A buffalo's bead sa.
5) Ar. on a fesse indented sa. (another, dancettee gu.) three bezants.
6) Ar. on a saltire sa. five swans of the first.
7) Ar. on a fesse sa. five bezants.
8) Az. flory and fretty (another, fretty and flory) or.
9) Gu. seven mascles conjunct vaire.
10) (Lincolnshire). Ar. on a saltire sa. five swans ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Saltire
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P63
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P106
18. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P160-173