Bruin Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bruin Family Coat of Arms

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Bruin Coat of Arms Meaning

Bruin Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Bruen.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Bruin. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Bruin Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bruin blazon are the eagle, lion passant and escallop. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, guttee de sang and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The gutte or goutte is an elongated tear-drop shape with wavy sides and usually appears in large number spread evenly across the field. 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gouttes Some frequently do they occur that special names have arisen for the various colours, guttee de sang being gules (or red) for its obvious resemblence to split blood.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bruin Name

Bruin Origin:

England, Germany

Origins of Bruin:

This most unusual surname, while ultimately of Old German origin, is a Dutch name like the Old High German “brun,” which is similar to the Old French and Olde English “brun,” which means brown, appeared as “bruin” in the Dutch language, where it also means bear. Hence, this was a nickname given to a person with especially brown hair, or a brown color, or to one who always wore brown clothes. The name may infrequently be from the Olde English special name “Brun” or the Old Norse “Bruni,” from the similar terminal origin. The surnames Brown, Browne, Broun(e) (England), Braun, Bru(h)n (Germany) and Bruno (Portugal), and much more, all acquire from a similar source. The surname was first listed in England in the early 13th Century, and Patrick le Bruin was introduced in 1269 in the Assize Court Rolls of Northumberland. William Bruyn noted in 1330 in the “Calendar of Inquisitiones post mortem” (Wiltshire). Anna, daughter of Harmen and Hilletje Bruijn, named in December 1657 at Rotterdam, Holland, while Evrouw, daughter of Hendriks and Grietie Bruin, named in December 1697 at Jisp, Noord-Holland. A Royal symbol given to a Bruin family, which represents a silver lion rampant, guttee de sang, on a blue field.

Variations:

More common variations are: Bruwin. Bruine, Bruijn, Bruini, Brouin, Bruein, Baruin, Bruina, Brauin.

England:

The surname Bruin was first found in Leicestershire Where they held a family seat from old times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the coming of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD. The name was originally Bregwin, notable Brewin.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William Bruin, dated about 1209, in the “Pleas before the King and His Justice 1198-1212”, It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland”, dated 1199- 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Bruin had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bruin landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Bruin who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Peter Bruin, who landed in New Netherland(s) in 1660. John Bruin landed in Virginia in 1698.

People with the surname Bruin who landed in the United States in the 18th century included William Bruin, who arrived in Virginia in 1702. Francis Bruin, who landed in America in 1728.

The following century saw more Bruin surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Bruin who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Jan De Bruin, who landed in Iowa in 1853-1855. Johanna De Bruin, who landed in Iowa in 1854. Krijn De Bruin, who landed in Iowa in 1854. Maartje De Bruin, who arrived in Iowa in 1857. Joost De Bruin, who came to Iowa in the year 1857.

Canada:

People with the surname Bruin settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 19th Some of the individuals with the surname Bruin who came to Canada in the 19th century included James Bruin, who landed in Canada in the year 1812. James Bruin at the age of 20, arrived in Canada in the year 1812.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bruin: Netherlands 5,807; South Africa 3,525; United States 850; England 317; Canada 220; Australia 173; France 171; Brazil 127; New Zealand 125; Belgium 52

Notable People:

Jan Bruin was born September in 1969 in Hollum, Ameland. He is a retired Dutch football player. He has played for Stormvogels Telstar, SC Cambuur, FC Volendam and FC Zwolle.

Bruin Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bruin family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. an eagle displ. sa. armed gu. Crest: A man ar. with a crutch in the right hand or, and a basket at his back of the last, on a staff of the second.
2) Az. a lion ramp. ar. guttee de sang.
3) Quarterly, gu. and az. four estoiles or.
4) (Stapleford, co. Chester). Ar. an eagle displ. sa. Crest—A fisherman per pale ar. and sa. each several article of dress counterchanged, in the right hand a fisherman’s staff, in the sinister a landing net thrown over the shoulder or.
5) (Torven, co. Chester). Sa. an eagle displ. ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gouttes
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91