Brunton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Brunton Family Coat of Arms

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Brunton Coat of Arms Meaning

Brunton Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Brunton. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Brunton Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Brunton blazon are the eagle, garb and beacon with flames. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe

The Beacon is an iron basket raised on a post used for signalling in the event of peril or invasion and can be borne in flames or empty. A similar device, used more prosaically as a street light is the cresset. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Beacon Either device, for reasons that should be quite clear are to be regarded as emblems of “one who is watchful”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P116

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Brunton Name

Brunton Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Brunton:

This name is of Northern English or Scottish geographical origin from either of two places in Northumberland called Brunton, or from the hamlet of Brunton in the church Criech, Fife. The older two, is listed as “Burneton” and “Brunton” in the Feets of Fines for Northumberland, dated 1242 – 1296, and are so called from the Olde English pre 7th Century “burna” which means a lake, water source or stream, and “tun,” an area. So, the whole meanings of the name are “an area by a stream.” The Scottish place name shares a similar meaning and derivation. The surname first shows on a list in England towards the end of the 13th Century. One Walter of Burntoun held part of Luffness, Scotland, in the period of Robert 111 (1390 – 1406), and a John Brountoun was the resident of Aliebank, Selkirkshire in 1558. Interesting name ancestors were William Brunton (1771 – 1851), engineer and inventor, employed in Boulton and Watt’s, Soho, 1796 – 1818, and manufacturer of the first marine steam engine. George Brunton (1799 – 1836), Scottish advocate and a miscellaneous author was born in Edinburgh.

Variations:

More common variations are: Braunton, Bruneton, Bruinton, Bruenton, Bruniton, Bruntton, Brounton, Brunetton, Brauniton, Brenton.

England:

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Adam de Brunton, dated about 1292, in the “Hundred Rolls of Shropshire.” It was during the time of King Edward 1st, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Brunton landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Brunton who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Grozel Brunton, who came to Salem, Massachusetts in 1745. Grizel Brunton, who landed in Salem, Massachusetts in 1775 and Archibald Brunton, who arrived in Mississippi in 1799.

The following century saw much more Brunton surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Brunton who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included James Brunton who settled in Philadelphia in 1840.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Brunton who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included James Brunton at the age of 20, who was a farmer, arrived in Bluff. New Zealand aboard the ship “Christian McAusland” in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Brunton: United Stats 2,792; England 2,592; Canada 1,011; New Zealand 947; Australia 921; Scotland 847; South Africa 256; Germany 168; Ireland 153; Wales 135.

Notable People:

Alan Brunton (1946–2002), was a New Zealand poet.

Barbara Brunton, born Barbara Joan Brunton Gibb, (1927–2014), was an Australian stage and radio actress.

Colin Brunton (born 1955), is a Canadian film producer.

Dorothy Brunton (1890–1977), was an Australian musician and actress.

Gordon Brunton (born 1921), is an English businessperson.

Guy Brunton (1878–1948), was an English archaeologist and Egyptologist.

James Brunton was a Canadian justice.

Joseph Brunton (1902–1988), was an American Boy Scout leader.

Lauder Brunton (1844–1916), was a Scottish specialist and first of the Brunton baronets.

Martin Brunton (born 1983), is an English Pool Player. He was born in the year 1983.

Mary Brunton (1778–1818), was a Scottish novel writer.

Matt Brunton (1878–1962), was an English soccer player.

Neil Brunton (born 1969), is an Australian rules football player.

Paul Brunton (1898–1981), was a British scholar and professor.

Richard Henry Brunton (1841–1901), was a Scottish lighthouse builder active in Japan.

Robbie Brunton (born 1973), is an Irish soccer player. He was born in the year 1973.

Ron Brunton was an Australian anthropologist.

Samuel Brunton (born 1990), is a Cook Islands rugby league player. He was born in the year 1990.

Violet Brunton (1878–1951), was an English artist.

Brunton Family Gift Ideas

Browse Brunton family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Motto—Fax mentis incendium gloriae. Or, three eagles displ. gu. Crest—A beacon with flames of fire ppr.
2) Motto, over the Crest—Lux et salus. Or, a garb betw. three eagles displ. gu. Crest—A beacon with flames of fire ppr

1 Comment

  • Richard McNaughton Brunton says:

    I am delighted to find so much information about family Brunton on your site and a brilliant range of products bearing the CoA.
    I have provided some information in my separate email seeking inclusion on your database of clan McNaughton. Perhaps you may
    like to consider adding my brother and myself to your list of notable Brunton people?
    Leslie John Brunton b.1946 – leading design engineer for most of the UK tramway systems’ power supply and overhead.
    Richard McNaughton Brunton b.1949 – UK-based musician & composer. Recording credits (all music.com / search Richard Brunton guitar)
    include Gerry Rafferty, Doctor John, Barbara Dickson etc
    With best wishes
    Richard

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Beacon
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P116