fbpx
Which one is mine?

Sign Up For Our Newsletter

Sign up today for our newsletter and receive a free video explaining what a “coat of arms” is!

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Bucher Coat of Arms and Family Crest

This interesting surname is of French origin and is a professional name for a butcher or slaughterer, an important occupation in early England.  The origin is from the Old French "bouchier" and the Middle English development "Bo(u)cher". More common variations are: Boucher, Baucher, Beucher, Buecher, Bucheru, Buchera, Buchear, Bhucher.

The surname Bucher first appeared in Bavaria, where the name Bucher made a great early donation to the feudal society of early Europe. The name Bucher became famous in local affairs and branched into many houses where members continued to play important roles in the savage tribal and national struggles, which produced an each group sought to enhance its power and status in an ever changing territorial profile.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ailwardus Le Bochere, dated 1184, in the Pipe Rolls of London. It was during the reign of King Henry 11, who was known as "The Builder of Churches", dated 1154-1189.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the people with the name Bucher who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Bucher, who arrived in Virginia in 1635.  William Bucher, who landed in Virginia in 1635.  Richard Bucher, who landed in Virginia in 1638. People with the surname Bucher who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Peter Bucher, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1724.  Nicalus Bucher, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1727. Some of the people with the surname Bucher who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Johan Bucher, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1802.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Middlesex). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three talbots pass. or.
2) Per fesse sa. and or, a tree couped and eradicated, counterchanged.
3) Quarterly or and gu. a canton erm. and bordure sa. bezantee.

Leave a Reply

References

  • 1 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
  • 2 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
  • 3 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
  • 4 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 6 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 8 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 9 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 10 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
  • 12 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 13 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 14 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45