Buckminster Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Buckminster Family Coat of Arms

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Buckminster Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Buckminster blazon are the lion rampant and billet. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the billet is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. In form it is a simple rectangle though sometimes has a slightly rounded or ragged appearance to reflect one possible origin as a block of wood cut by an axe. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Billet. Wade groups the billet with the other square charges as symbols of “honesty and constancy”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P95

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Buckminster Name

Origins of Buckminster:
The ancestors of the Buckminster family produced their name to England in the wave of migration after the Norman Invasion of 1066. They resided in the settlement of Buckminster, Leicestershire.  The surnames acquired from residence at location.  The place name itself acquired from the Old English components, Bucca, which was a nickname for a person with a considered resemblance to a goat, and mynster, meaning monastery.  Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fixed system of spelling rules.  For that reason, spelling variations occurred commonly in Anglo Norman surnames.  Over the years, many variations of the name Buckminster noted, including as Buckminster, Buckmaster, Buckmasters, Buckminsters, Buckmisters, Buckmuster and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Buckminister, Buckminester, Bukminster, Buckmenster, Buckmunster, Beckmenster, Begminster.

England:
The surname Buckminster first appeared in Leicestershire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Estate of Buckminster at the time of the Norman Invasion of England by Duke William of Normandy in 1066 AD in that shire.  Conjecturally they dropped from the ‘son of Walter’, a Norman noble, who held these lands from the Priest of Lincoln at the time of the taking of the Domesday Book survey in the year 1086 AD. The church in the village is said to be the site of baptismal of Anglo-Saxon converts.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Buckminster landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, and 19th.    Some of the people with the name Buckminster who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Buckminster, who settled in Boston, Massachusetts in the year 1850. The following century saw more Buckminster surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Buckminster who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included James Buckminster, who landed in New England in the year 1640.  Thomas Buckminster arrived in New England in the same year 1646.

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Browse Buckminster family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Peterborough; granted 24 March, 1578). Ar. semee of fleurs-de-lis, a lion ramp. sa.
2) (Leicestershire). Ar. a lion ramp. betw. eight billets sa.
3) (Northamptonshire). Ar. semee d’estoiles sa. a lion ramp. of the last. Crest—A demi lion double queued sa. holding a battle-axe or, headed ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Billet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P95