Budd Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Budd Family Coat of Arms

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Budd Coat of Arms Meaning

Budd Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Budd. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
budd coat of arms

Budd Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Budd blazon are the fesse dancette, star and arrows. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. This created an opportunity to add decorative edging to the band, of many forms, and to very pleasing artisitic effect, at least close up – it must be admitted that at distance some of the forms are hard to distinguish! Dancettee (sometimes spelled dancetty or dancy) is a bold, zig-zag pattern, perhaps the most distinctive of the patterned edges. Purists might argue that the French variant denché Is not the same, being of larger size and with the points being 90º, but there is much variation in actual practice so the difference is perhaps not that meaningful.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77More modern arms might use the term star explicitly to refer to the celestial object, in which case it is usually known as a blazing star 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The regular prescence of the arrow, both singly and in groups is evidence of this. In British heraldry a lone arrow normally points downward, but in the French tradition it points upwards. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Arrow. The presence of an arrow in a coat of arms is reckoned to indicate “martial readiness” by Wade. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Budd Name

Origins of Budd:
This old and intriguing name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and acquires from the Old English particular name or byname, “Budda”.  There is some confusion about the original meaning of the name.  It may reflect the use of the Old English pre 7th century “budde”, bud, swelling, as a nickname for a plump or thickset person, or it may also have used as a nickname for someone with some fancied similarity to a beetle, from the Old English “budda”, beetle.  The first record, below, is strictly speaking that of a byname, and the entry represents the person as being “so called because of his thickness”.  The personal name Budda shows in some English place names, such as Budbrooke, in Warwickshire, and Budworth in Cheshire, and has created a variety of derivative surnames, among them the diminutive form’s, Budcock, and the patronymics Budds and Budding.  The wedding of one Bartholomew Budd and Mary Smyth noted at St. Andrew by the Wardrobe, in London, in February 1573.

Variations:
More common variations are: Buddo, Budde, Buddy, Budda, Buddi, Buddu, Buddh, Baudd, Boudd, Buidd.

England:
The surname Budd first appeared in Cornwall, where they held a family seat from very early times, some say before the Norman Invasion in 1066 AD. The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Brihtmerus Budde, dated 1025, in the Record of Old English By names. It was during the reign of King Cantue, dated 1016-1035.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:
Some of the people with the name Budd who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Joseph Budd, who arrived in Minnesota in 1632.  John Budd, who landed in Massachusetts in 1633.  Jo Budd, aged 15, arrived in Virginia in 1635.  John Budd settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1637.  Giles Budd settled in Virginia in 1639 People with the surname Budd who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Budd settled in Nevis in 1722.  Nicolas Budd, who landed in Massachusetts in 1743. The following century saw much more Budd surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Budd who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Catharine Budd, who landed in New York in 1824.  Andrea Johan Budd, aged 30, arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in 1850.  J R Budd, who landed in San Francisco, Cai in 1850. People with the surname Budd who landed in the United States in the 20th century included Sandov Budd, who landed in Alabama in 1928.

Canada:
Some of the people with the surname Budd who arrived in the Canada in the 18th century included Ezekial Budd, who arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1749-1752. Samuel Budd, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749.  Ezekiel Budd, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749.  Israel Budd, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750.  Samuel Budd, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1750.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Budd who landed in Australia in the 19th century included George Budd, English prisoner from Surrey, who moved aboard the “Andromeda” in November 1832, settling in New South Wales, Australia.  Eliza Budd arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Asia” in 1839.  Harriet Budd, English criminal from Sussex, who moved aboard the “Angelina” in April 1844, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia.  Richard Budd, English convict from Gloucester, who moved aboard the “Agincourt” in July 1844, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia.  Robert Budd arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Mariner” in 1847.

Budd Family Gift Ideas

Browse Budd family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Willesley, co. Devon). Blazon: Azure a fesse dancette, in chief a bow bent in fesse, and three arrows, two in saltire and one in pale, tied with a ribbon in base, all or. Crest—A hurt charged with a star of seven points or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Star
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Arrow
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111