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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Sa. a chev. betw. three burling irons ar.
2) Erm. on a chief embattled gu. three cinquefoils ar. Crest—A demi savage brandishing a scimetar ppr.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Burland Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Burland Origin:

England

Origins of Burland:

It is an English locational surname. It starts from the hamlet of Burland in the East Riding of Yorkshire, and was first noted in the famous Domesday Book of England in 1086. In this book, it appears as 'Birland,' a form which occasionally appeared as the surname spelling. The origin is from the pre 7th century Olde English 'burgh-landa', meaning literally 'the lands relating to the borough.' As to which 'burgh' or 'borough' pointed to by the place name is not clear. It may have been itself, but could even have been York, the district capital. The division of Cheshire also has a Burland hamlet of the similar meaning, but there are no surname records to appeared in Cheshire until the 18th century. It is much too late to have been a place of origination. The first record in that division considered having occurred when Elizabeth Burland married Joseph Royle at Knutsford, in January of that year. The name in Yorkshire much earlier and particularly well noted in the area known as 'The old kingdom of Elmet.' It is an area east of York. Records from this area include as Thomas Burland of Aberford in September 1542, William Burland of Monk Fryston in January 1612 and Alice Burland, who married Richard Kent at Barwick in Elmet, in December 1655.

Variations:

More common variations are: Bourland, Burlando, Burlandy, Burlandi, Burlyand, Burlland, Bureland, Buralanda, Burrland, Buorland.

England:

The surname Burland first appeared in Surrey, where they had given lands by King William after the Norman Invasion in 1066.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Burland had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Burland landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Burland who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John, Burland In, who arrived in Virginia in 1639.

The following century saw much more Burland surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Burland who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included John, Burland In, who came to Virginia in 1639.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Burland: United States 525; England 500; Canada 142; France 110; Australia 97; New Zealand 33; Sweden 22; Bermuda 13; Wales 3; South Africa 2

Notable People:

John Boscawen Burland CBE FREng FRS (born in March 1936) is an Emeritus Professor and Senior Research Researcher at the Section of Civil and Environmental Engineering of Imperial College London.

Alan Burland (born September 1952) is a Bermudian pilot. He took part at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles, where he placed fifth in the multihull class, together with Christopher Nash.

Brian Burland (April 1931–February 2010) was a Bermudian author, who was the writer of nine acclaimed novels that typically dealt with colonialism, family conflict, and race.

Cottie Arthur Burland (September 1905 – 1983) was a British writer and researcher. He studied at the Regent Street Polytechnic, graduated from the University of Westminster, and spent much of his forty-year job traversing from 1925 to 1965, in the Section of Ethnography at the British Museum in London.

Burland Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Burland blazon are the burling iron, chevron and cinquefoil. The four main tinctures (colors) are argent, sable, gules and ermine.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 9 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 10. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.11. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

It is important that a coat of arms be easily recognised and so everyday objects were frequently used as clearly identifiable charges – tools 12 being a common and important example of these, of which the burling iron is typical. Some of these tools are rather obscure to modern eyes, who of us nowadays would recognise a hemp-break 13, let alone know what to use it for! Who now for example, nows that the burling iron is actually a tool used in weaving, and hence probably references that trade within the family in question.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 14, or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.15. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 16, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 17. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 18 It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

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References

  • 1 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 2 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 3 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 4 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 5 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 6 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 7 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
  • 8 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
  • 9 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
  • 10 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
  • 11 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
  • 12 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
  • 13 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P163
  • 14 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 15 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 16 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
  • 17 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
  • 18 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil