Burley Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Burley Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Burley Coat of Arms Meaning

Burley Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Burley. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
burley coat of arms

Burley Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Burley blazon are the boar’s head, lance, lion and paly. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, sable and or .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The spear or lance is a typical example, often borne (for obvious reasons) in allusion to the crucifixtion. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111 Sometimes only the head is shown, and on other occasions the tilting or tournament spear is specified, familiar to us from many a jousting scene in the movies. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 18Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 19A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 20The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Burley Family Gift Ideas

Don’t like ordering online? Order by phone 1-408-983-2800

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Burley Name

Burley Origin:
England

Origins of Burley:
This notable surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is locational from any of the different places so called, for example, Burley in Derbyshire, Rutland, Shropshire and the West Riding of Yorkshire. The name in all examples acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century “burg,” a fort, and “leah,” a clearing in wood.  So, “the clearing by a fort.”  Locational surnames were originally derived by a local landowner, or by the lord of the estate, and especially by those old inhabitants of a place who moved to another area, usually in search of work, and were there best recognized by the name of their birthplace.

Variations:
More common variations are: Bourley, Buerley, Baurley, Buirley, Buhrley, Bhurley, Burliey, Burhley, Burleyh, Burrley.

England:
The surname Burley first appeared in Somerset where Burley Castle where a motte and bailey castle of the late 11th or early 12th century remains to this day.  The village and civil church Burley, or Burley-on-the-Hill, is located two miles north- east of Oakham in Rutland. Burleigh Castle existed near the hamlet of Milnathort, in Perth and Kinross, Scotland and dates from the 15th and 16th centuries.  It was held by the Balfours from 1446. Burleigh is also a village in Berkshire, England, within the civil church of Warfield.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John de Borleg, dated 1273, in the Hundred Rolls of Shropshire”.   It was during the reign of King Edward 1, who was known as “The Hammer of the Scots” dated 1272-1307.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Burley had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Burley landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.    Some of the people with the name Burley who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Timothy Burley, who arrived in Virginia in 1622.  Rodger Burley settled in Virginia in 1635.  Rodger Burley, aged 17, landed in Virginia in 1635.

People with the surname Burley who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Hugh Burley, who landed in Virginia in 1705

The following century saw more Burley surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Burley who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included C. Burley settled in Baltimore Maryland in 1820.

Canada:
People with the surname Burley who landed in the Canada in the 18th century included Fredk Burley, who landed in Nova Scotia in 1749.  Fredk, Burley Jr., who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749.  Mr. Freeman Burley U.E. who settled in Ernestown, Lennox & Addington, Ontario c. 1783.

The following century saw more Burley surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Burley who arrived in the Canada in the 19th century included Ezekiel Burley who came to Canada in 1840.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Burley who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Robert Burley arrived in Holdfast Bay, Australia aboard the ship “Katherine Stewart Forbes” in 1837.  Robert Burley arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Rajasthan” in 1838.

New-Zealand:
Some of the population with the surname Burley who arrived in  New Zealand in the 19th century included George Burley, aged 27, a laborer, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Bebington” in 1872.  Richard John Burley, aged 28, a coach builder, came in Hawkes Bay aboard the ship “Countess of Kintore” in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Burley:
United States 9,510; England 4,340; Australia 1,851; Canada 1,526; South Africa 438; Scotland 282; Wales 248; New Zealand 218; France 134; Germany 134.

Notable People:
George Burley was a Scottish football player and manager.
Gillian Beer (born Burley), was a British literary scholar.
Jane Burley is a Scottish field hockey midfielder.
Jos Burley was a member of New Zealand’s women’s cricket team.
Joseph Leonard Burley is the founder of the Burley Football Company.
Kay Burley was an English television newscaster.
Nancy Burley (1930–2013), was an Australian figure skater.
Nick Burley is an American boxer.

Burley Family Gift Ideas

Browse Burley family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

Kitchen & Bath

Fun & Games

More burley Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Leicestershire and Wiltshire). Vert, three boars’ heads couped ar. armed or. Crest—A demi boar ppr. armed, hoofed, and bristled or, and gorged with a chain of the last, supporting a thistle ppr.
2) (Devon). Ar. a chief sa., three lances counterchanged.
3) (Sir Simon, Sir Richard and Sir John Burley, all K.Gs., temp. Richard II.). Barry of six sa. and or, on a chief of the last two pallets of the first, an inescutcheon gu. charged with three bars erm.
4) (Shropshire). Paly of six sa. and or, on a chief of the second two pallets of the first, an inescutcheon barry of six gu. and erm.
5) Sa. three bars or, a chief of the last charged with two pellets, on an inescutcheon erm. three bars gu.
6) Paly of six ar. and az. over all three bars gu.
7) Or, three bars sa. a chief paly erm. and gu.
8) Ar. a lion ramp. sa. debruised with a fesse chequy or and az.
9) Per fesse embattled sa. and ar. three lances counterchanged.
10) Ar. three tilting spears in pale sa. embrued gu. a chief of the second.
11) (alias Mylde). Ar. a lion ramp. sa. armed gu. debruised by a fesse chequy or and az.
12) (John Burley, Sheriff, co. Salop, 1409). Vert, three boars’ heads couped ar.
13) (Ireland). Erm. four bars gu. a border gobony ar. and sa.
14) Erm. a bend gu. three chev. or.
15) Quarterly, ar. and sa.
16) Gu. two bars gobonated ar. and az.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
19. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
20. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60