Burnam Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Burnam Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Burnam. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

burnam coat of arms

Burnam Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Burnam blazon are the maunch, lion’s head and cross crosslet. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and gules .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.7The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

When people are depicted in heraldry their clothing and appearance are often described in some detail 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. We also find individual items of clothing used as charges in a coat of arms, and maunch is a good example of this, representing a loose sleeve. Sometimes these items are drawn in a somewhat stylised fashion, not always obvious as to what it represents. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Maunch Wade suggests that its use came from a role in the tournament in which a part of clothing or some other trinked was given as a token to knights in combat by their supporters. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P50

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts.13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 The head of the lion also appears alone on many coats of arms, but its use in this form is largely to enable a clear difference from similar arms that use the complete animal, and its significance should be taken to be the same as the lion entire, being a symbol of “deathless courage”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P59

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

Burnam Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Burnam Name

Origins of Burnam:
In old Anglo-Saxon England, the ancestors of the Burnam surname resided in any of the various places called Burnham in Buckinghamshire, Essex, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, or Suffolk. These place names acquire from the Old English words burna or water source and ham, or homestead. It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has regulated. For that reason, early Anglo-Saxon surnames like Burnam are characterized by many spelling variations. As the English language changed and incorporated components of other European languages, even educated people changed the spelling of their names. The variations of the name Burnam include Burnham, Burnam and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Burnham, Burnama, Burnahm, Burhnam, Burnaam, Burinam, Burname, Beurnam, Burnnam, Bhurnama.

England:
The surname Burnam first appeared in Herefordshire where they held a family seat from very early times. Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Burnam had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Burnam landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Burnam who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Burnam, who came to Maryland in the year 1658.

The following century saw more Burnam surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Burnam who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Burnam, who arrived in San Francisco in the year 1861.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Burnam: United States 1,818; Australia 6; India 6; Mexico 3; Netheriands 2; Singapore 1; Germany 1; Romania 1; South Africa 1; Thailand 1.

Notable People:
Lon Maxwell Burnam (born July 1953) is an old member of the Texas House of Representatives for District 90, which includes downtown Fort Worth, Texas, and surrounding areas. A Democrat, Burnam is the former executive director of the Dallas Peace Center. He initially selected to the state House in 1996. In March 2016, Burnam ran last with 269,853 votes (24.8 percent) in a three-candidate field in the Democratic primary election for the seat on the Texas Railroad Commission being vacated by the Republican David J. Porter. The two remaining Democratic candidates, Cody Garrett, who polled 382,647 votes (35.2 percent), and Grady Yarbrough, with 434,137 votes (40 percent), will met in the May 24 runoff election to choose the party nominee for the position. He holds a bachelor’s degree in government from the University of Texas at Austin. He holds two master’s degree, one from UT-Austin and the second in municipal and regional planning from the University of Texas at Arlington. He is a member of the Society of Friends or the Quaker Church. He voted against the 2013 legislation to ban abortion beyond the twentieth week of gestation. He opposed companion legislation to increase the medical and health requirements of agencies performing abortions. He is rated 0 percent by The Texas Right to Life Committee.

Burnam Family Gift Ideas

Browse Burnam family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More burnam Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Lincolnshire). Or, a maunch vert.
2) Gu. a chev. or, betw. three lions' heads erased ar.
3) Ar. a bend sa. betw. two crosses crosslet of the second.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Maunch
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P50
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P59
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103