Bushby Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Bushby Family Coat of Arms

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Bushby Coat of Arms Meaning

Bushby Name Origin & History

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Bushby Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Bushby blazon are the clove, crow and passion cross. The three main tinctures (colors) are vair, gules and argent .

Special patterns, of a distinctive shape are frequently used in heraldry and are know as furs, representing the cured skins of animals 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. Although they were originally derived from real creatures the actual patterns have become highly stylised into simple geometric shapes, bell-like in the case of vair. 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P46-49. vair is a particularly interesting example that resonates today – the “glass” slippers worn by Cinderella are actually a mis-translation of “vair” (i.e. fur) slippers, the very same vair that appears in heraldry! 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vair

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Many items found in the natural world occur in coats of arms, including many plants that people of the middle ages would be familiar with. Several varities of bush and small plants frequently found in the hedgerows beside fields can be observed 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270, in addition to the famous thistle of Scotland 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P147. The clove is drawn not quite in the form that we know it today but rather as small “drop” shape seeds. For meaning we perhaps need to look at the spice trade perhaps, as this is an important element within that trade. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:clove

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The crow, raven, rook and many older names are commonly to be found on a coat of arms but all tend to share the same appearance 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164. Wade discusses the symbolism of the crow, disputing Sloane-Evans suggestion as an emblem of “long life” and preferring “a settled habitation and a quiet life” instead. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P81

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67 The calvary cross is a special form that most closely represents the crucifixion, being mounted on a series of steps or grices. Wade suggests that three of these steps might represent “faith, hope and charity”. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Bushby Name

Bushby Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Bushby:

This long-established surname may be of old English or early Scottish origin and is a geographical name either from Great or Little Busby, two churches south of Stokesley in the North Riding of Yorkshire, or from the estates of Busby in the church of Carmunnock, Renfrewshire. The Yorkshire places were initially listed as “Buschebi” in the Domesday Book of 1086, and differently as “Magna Buskebi” and “Parva Buskeby” in Early Yorkshire documents, dated near the year 1185, and are so called from the Old Norse “buski”, which means plant, bush, and “byr”, which means homestead, hamlet. So, “homestead by a copse of bushes.” The Scottish place was considered to be named with the similar components. Geographical surnames, like this, originally given to local landholders, and the king of the palace, and especially as a source of recognition to those who departed from their mother town to settle to any other place. Bushby in Leicestershire, noted as “Buzzebia” in the Domesday Book and rendering as “the homestead (“byr”) of Butr (an Old Norse personal name)” may also have given rise to some examples of the surname. One Ricardus de Busby and an Adam de Buskeby noted in the 1379 Census Tax Returns of Yorkshire, and in 1330 the office of notary presented on David de Busby of the parish of Glasgow. John Busby was minister to the Duke of Albany in 1408 and Richard Busby (1606- 1695) defined as “a famous schoolmaster and a zealous churchperson.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Bushbye, Bush-Bey, Pushby, Bushbu, Bashby, Bushabu, Boushab, Bushebi, Boushib, Bashbay.

England:

The surname Bushby first appeared in Leicestershire at Bushby, a village, in the church of Thurnby, union of Billesdon, hundred of Gartree.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Busseby, dated about 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Oxfordshire.” It was during the time of King Edward 1st, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. .

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Bushby had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Bushby landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Bushby who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included John Bushby who settled in Virginia in 1730. Mary Bushby settled in New England in 1746.

The following century saw more Bushby surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Bushby who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included William Bushby came to Philadelphia in 1846. Thomas Bushby at the age of 56, arrived in New York in 1868.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Bushby who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Christian Bushby arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Aden” in 1849. John Bushby arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Stebonheath” in 1849. Margaret Bushby arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Stebonheath” in the year 1849.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Bushby: England 1,291; Australia 847; South Africa 712; United States 376; Canada 135; New Zealand 83; Scotland 79; Guernsey 24; Spain 21; Normandy 20.

Notable People:

Karl Bushby was born in March 1969. He is a British ex-paratrooper, walking traveler and writer, currently trying to be the first person to walk an entire path around the world completely.

Robert “Bob” Bushby was born in February 1927. He is an aircraft technician and pilot who created the Bushby Mustang II, later called the Mustang Aeronautics Mustang II.

Edward Bushby (April 1817–February 1856) was an English cricket player. He was a right-handed batsman and noted long stop fielder. He was born in Sompting, Sussex.

Bushby Family Gift Ideas

Browse Bushby family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Cumberland). Vair on a fesse gu. five cloves ar. Crest—A crow picking ppr.
2) (Henleaze, Norbiton, co. Surrey). Motto—Fructu non foliis. Vair, on a chief gu. five passion crosses ar. Crest—Upon a mount vert a stag's head erased ppr. guttee de sang, transfixed through the neck by an arrow bendwise, point towards the dexter, also ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P46-49
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vair
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P147
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:clove
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P81
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103