Camden Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Camden Family Coat of Arms

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Camden Coat of Arms Meaning

Camden Name Origin & History

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Camden Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Camden blazon are the cross crosslet fitchee and torteaux. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and torteau is a roundle gules, or red. (We must be careful however not to confuse this with the word in French heraldry, in which torteau means roundle and must have the colour specified.) Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Camden Name

Camden Origin:

England

Origin of Camden:

This interesting and unique name is of an Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a habitational surname acquiring from either one of the areas now known as Broad Campden and Chipping Campden, near Evesham, in Gloucestershire. The original agreement was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Campedene”, clearly showing the development from the ancient English pre 7th Century “campa-denu”, from “campas”, which means camp, from the Latin word “campus”, which means clear, plain, together with “denu”, which means Dale. The area name means “Dale with camps or an area bounded by something.” By the 14th Century, the agreement had parted, and was listed as “Cheping Caumpedene” and “Brodecaumpene.” Habitational surnames frequently were derived by those old residents of a place who shifted to another place and were thereafter best recognized by the name of their mother town. The new surname can appear as Camden and Cambden. Among the recordings of the name in London is that of the wedding of Thomas Cambden and Alice Rugg, at St. Stephen and St. Benet’s, in February 1696.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Camaden, Cameden, Camodien, Camadena, Cammaden, Comden, Camdon, Cumden, Gamden, Kamden.

England:

The surname Camden first appeared in Gloucestershire where they held a family seat from early times; some say well before the Norman invasion and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Ebrard de Campeden, which was dated 1190, in the “Cambridgeshire Pipe Rolls,” during the reign of King Richard I, known as “The Conqueror,” 1189 – 1199. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England, this known as Poll Tax.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Camden who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Charles Camden who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1850. Joseph Camden, who landed in Arkansas in 1860. Willis Camden, who came to Arkansas in 1860.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Camden: United States 3,604; England 414; Canada 219; Australia 184; New Zealand 24; Russia 6; United Arab Emirates 2; Thailand 2; Brazil 2; South Africa 1.

Notable People:

Marquess Camden is a name in the aristocracy of the United Kingdom. It was created in the year 1812 for the politician John Pratt, 2nd commander Camden. The Pratt family descends from Sir John Pratt, Chief Judge from the year 1718 to 1725. His third son from his second marriage, Sir Charles Pratt, was also an outstanding advocate and leader and gave services as Lord judge between the year 1766 and 1770.

Archie Camden (1888–1979) was a British bassoonist. He was a lecturer and player of international acclaim. His career started in 1906 when he attended the Hallé Orchestra, where he became senior administrator bassoonist in the year 1914. In the year 1933, he shifted to the BBC Band Orchestra, where he survived until 1946 when he took up the same post in the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra. He was also one of the first bassonists to experiment with registering.

Johnson Newlon Camden (March 1828 – April 1908) was a United States politician from West Virginia. He was born in Collins Settlement, Virginia (now West Virginia), he then joined the school in Sutton. He was selected as a student to the United States Military Academy at West Point from the year 1846 until 1848 when he retired. He received an education in law, was accepted to the bar and started practice in Sutton in 1851. He was selected the same year to try to gain the authority for Braxton division.

Johnson Newlon Camden Jr. (January 1865 – August 1942) was a United States politician from Kentucky. His father, Johnson N. Camden, had been an American politician from West Virginia.

Peter G. Camden (May 1801, in Amherst Division, Virginia – July 1873, in Jennings, Missouri) was the ninth mayor of St. Louis, Missouri serving from the year 1846–1847. He was a representative of the American Party.

William Camden (May 1551 in London – November 1623 in Chislehurst) was an English history writer, professor, geographer, and reporter. He was famous as a writer of Britannia, the first survey of the islands of Great Britain and Ireland, and the Annales, and the first detailed historical account of the rule of Elizabeth I of England.

Camden Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (William Camden, the author of “Britannia”). Az. a fesse engr. betw. six crosses crosslet fitchee or.
2) Or, a fesse engr. betw. six crosses crosslet fitchee sa. Crest—On a pile or, six estoiles gu.
3) Ar. a fesse gu. betw. three torteaux. Crest—A cross pattee per pale sa. and erm. betw. two wings counterchanged.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle