Carlow Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Carlow Family Coat of Arms

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Carlow Coat of Arms Meaning

Carlow Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Carlowe.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Carlow. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Carlow Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Carlow blazon are the leopard’s face, annulet and spear. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, sable and argent .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The spear or lance is a typical example, often borne (for obvious reasons) in allusion to the crucifixtion. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111 Sometimes only the head is shown, and on other occasions the tilting or tournament spear is specified, familiar to us from many a jousting scene in the movies. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Carlow Name

Mobile, Ala in 1851. Michael Carlow at the age of 10, landed in Mobile, Ala in 1851.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Carlow who came to Canada in the 18th century included Mr. John Carlow U.E. born in Maine, USA who settled in St. Andrews, Charlotte Division, New Brunswick near the year 1783. Mr. Martin Carlow U.E. born in Maine, USA who settled in St. Andrews, Charlotte County, New Brunswick near the year 1783.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Carlow who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included James Carlow arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “La Escocesa” in 1876.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Carlow: United States 1,127; Canada 183; England 177; Australia 167; Ireland 104; South Africa 73; Scotland 20; Trinidad and Tobago 19; New Zealand 17; Guyana 3.

Notable People:

F.C. Carlow (Irish: Cumann Peile Ceatharlach ) is an Irish association football club based in Division Carlow. Between 2009 and 2011 the club played in the A Championship. They were the first and to date so far, the only association football club from district Carlow to play in a senior national level league.

Carlow Family Gift Ideas

Browse Carlow family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Holbeach). Ar. on a chev. betw. three leopards’ heads sa. as many annulets of the first.
2) (Wales). Az. three spears in bend or, headed ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Spear