Chadwell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Chadwell Family Coat of Arms

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Chadwell Coat of Arms Meaning

Chadwell Name Origin & History

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Chadwell Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Chadwell blazon are the fesse dancette, fesse lozengy, mullet and swan’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, azure and or .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. This created an opportunity to add decorative edging to the band, of many forms, and to very pleasing artisitic effect, at least close up – it must be admitted that at distance some of the forms are hard to distinguish! Dancettee (sometimes spelled dancetty or dancy) is a bold, zig-zag pattern, perhaps the most distinctive of the patterned edges. Purists might argue that the French variant denché Is not the same, being of larger size and with the points being 90º, but there is much variation in actual practice so the difference is perhaps not that meaningful.

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. A special form, the fesse lozengy is made up of single coloured lozenge (diamond) shapes placed vertically, side by side across the field, where the fesse would normally be. Arguably, this should really be described as so-many lozenges conjoined in fess, to avoid confusion with the patterning lozengy, which is a treatment over the whole field of alternating coloured diamond shapes 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 321. Whatever the terminology this is a striking addition to any coat of arms, and the square-like form has encouraged Wade, the noted heraldic author to associate its use with Constancy…verity and probity” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Chadwell Name

Chadwell Origin:

England

Origin of Chadwell:

The Chadwell surname originally derives from an Anglo-Saxon origin. It is a locational surname stemming from any one of the areas named as “Caldwell” in North Yorkshire and Warwickshire, “Cauldwell” in Bedfordshire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire, and other regions called with the similar components like “Chadwell,” “Chardwell” and “Caudle Green.” The area in Yorkshire is listed as “Caldeuuella” in the Domesday Book of 1086. It’s meaning and origin is a combination of two words, one of which is “the cold water source, or lake”, from the Olde English pre 7th Century word “cald, ceald”, which means cold or cool, combined with the word “well, waell”, which means stream, flow lake or well. The surname also appeared in Scotland, where it acquires from “Caldwell” in Renfrewshire. There are a great many variations of the new surname, varying from Caldwell, Cau(l)dwell, and Cawdell to Cadwell, Coldwell, and Chadwell. John Caldwell married Margaret Matthews at St. George’s, Hanover Square, London, in the year 1581.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Chadell, Chadwell, Shadwell, Chatwell, Chidwell, Chadelle, Chadella, Chedwell, Chaidell, Chaddell.

England:

The name Chadwell first appeared in Essex at Chadwell, a church, in the union of Orsett, Hundred of Barstable. The Domesday Book of 1086 records the area name was Celdeuulla.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Adam de Caldwella, which was dated 1195, in the “Pipe Rolls of Derbyshire.” It was during the time of King Richard I, who was known to be the “The Lionheart,” 1189 – 1199. The origin of surnames during this period became an important requirement for the development of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country started to develop, with different and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Chadwell who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Chadwell, who landed in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1636. Thomas Chadwell, who arrived in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1648. Dan Chadwell and his wife Anne settled in Virginia in 1651. Ann Chadwell, who landed in Virginia in 1651. Dan Chadwell, who arrived in Virginia in 1653.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Chadwell: United States 4,126; England 86; Canada 18; Germany 1; Italy 1; Kazakhstan 1; South Africa 1; Australia 1; Trinidad and Tobago 1; Bahrain 1.

Notable People:

William Chadwell (born 1614) was an English advocate and politician who sat in the House of Commons between the year 1640 and 1644. He followed the Royalist cause in the English Civil war.

Robert Chadwell was the son of William Chadwell, of Broadwell, Gloucestershire. He got his matric degree at Exeter College, Oxford in December 1631 at the age of 17 and awarded a BA in June 1632. He was named to the bar at Lincoln’s Inn in 1640. In April 1640, Chadwell was selected representative of the court for Mitchell in the Short Parliament. He again was chosen as an army officer for Mitchell for the Long Assembly in November 1640 and gave services till he was displaced for supporting the King in January 1644. He was rewarded the D.C.L. in November 1644.

Jamey Chadwell is the senior football referee at Charleston Southern University. He was the first top referee at North Greenville University and Delta State University for one season. He grew up in Tennessee and visited East Tennessee State University where he played quarterback from the year 1995 to 1999. He started his coaching job in 2000 at East Tennessee State before taking a senior status at Charleston Southern University in 2004.

William Chadwell Mylne, FRS (April 1781 – December 1863) was a British engineer and builder. He was descended from a Scottish family of workers and builders and was the second son of Robert Mylne (1733–1811), civil engineer to the New River Company, and architect of the first Blackfriars Bridge in London.

Heather Chadwell was born in May 1975. She is an American actress, reality character, comedian, and administrator of Hollywood Heather, LLC. She is famous for her performance on VH1’s Rock of Love but has also adventured into acting with a small performance in a scene of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia.

Chadwell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Chadwell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: None. Blazon: Argent a fesse dancette azure. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet a dexter hand holding by the neck a swan's head erased all proper.
2) Notes: None. Blazon: Or, a fesse lozengy azure in chief a mullet gules.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 321
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105