Colgan Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Colgan Family Coat of Arms

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Colgan Coat of Arms Meaning

Colgan Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Cologan.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Colgan. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Colgan Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Colgan blazon are the lion and pheon. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 9A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Colgan Name

Colgan Origin:

Ireland

Origin of Colgan:

Listed in many spelling forms such as Colgan or MacColgan, this is the shortened form of McColgan, and ultimately as O’Colgan. It is a Gaelic-Irish surname with a great history. It is true that it is now related to Scotland but this is basically because of the works of the great Scottish manager Liz McColgan. The Irish forebear verified in the old socuments that the surname is related to O’Colgan. The O’Colgans being kings of a barony in Ulster. It would last like that until the 15th century when there were two divisions of the tribe, the MacColgans from the hamlet of Kilcolgan. The name itself is of unknown meaning, but its style suggests that it is ultimately defined as a supporter of St Columba, the first Irish religious person of the 6th century. The surname is especially related to the Roman Catholic parish, where representatives have been very important. Previous examples of the surname consist of the Revered John Colgan, a Franciscan priest, and writer of many Holy works. He passed away in 1658 in France. He had a friend named as John MacColgan who was the religious person of Derry in the 18th century, while the Joseph Colgan (1824 – 1911) was the priest of Madras, India. The first known documentation of the surname is perhaps that of Teag O’Colgan, king of the palace of Tirkeen, in the division of Derry. He considered having passed away in the year 1372.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Coligan, Cologan, Colagan, Colgane, Colghan, Colgain, Colhgan, Collgan, Colegan, Colygan.

Ireland:

The surname Colgan was first organized in division Derry, also famous as Londonderry where they request to decline from O’Conros (Faley) with Cumasach, brother of Aeneas, having introduced their surname from the Irish “colg” meaning “shield,” so the name Colgan was a “swordsman,” a quo Clann Colgain.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Colgan who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Edward Colgan, Hugh Colgan, and John Colgan who all landed in New York, NY in the same year in 1812. George Colgan, who arrived in New York, NY in 1816. Patrick Colgan, at the age of 36, arrived in New York, NY in 1847.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Colgan who settled in the Canada in the 19th century included John Colgan, at the age of 25, who was a worker, Ann Colgan, at the age of 24, and William Colgan, at the age of 2, all arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in the same year in 1833 aboard the ship “John & Marry” from Belfast Ireland. Mr. Honora Colgan at the age of 19 who shifted to Canada, arriving at the Gross Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship “Industry” leaving the Harbor of Dublin, Ireland but passed away on Grosse Isle in October 1847. Miss. Judith Colgan, at the age of 17 who moved to Canada, coming to the Gross Isle Quarantine Station in Quebec aboard the ship “John Munn” leaving from the Harbor of Liverpool, England but passed away on Gross Island in September 1847.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Coglan who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Edward Colgan at the age of 35, arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “Lord Raglan.” Anne Colgan at the age of 18, who was a home slave, landed in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “Lord of the Isles.” Patrick Colgan at the age of 50, a laborer, Laurence Colgan, at the age of 23, a laborer, and James Colgan at the age of 17, who was a worker, all arrived in South Australia in the same year in 1858 aboard the ship “Bee.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Colgan who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Stephen Colgan at the age of 23, was a farmer, came in Nelson aboard the ship “Hannibal” in 1875. Bridget Colgan at the age of 17, Rose Colgan, at the age of 16, a servant and Eliza Colgan, at the age of 21, all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “British Queen” in the same year in 1883.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Colgan: United States 4,593; England 1,291; Wales 79; Australia 553; Scotland 151; Canada 464; Ireland 1,550; Northern Ireland 537; Germany 134; New Zealand 107.

Notable People:

Charles J. Colgan, American Democratic politician, and businessman from Virginia

Eileen Colgan (c. 1934 – 2014), was an Irish artist and entertainer.

Jay Colgan was an American merchant.

Jenny Colgan was a British novel writer.

John Colgan was an Irish professor.

Colgan Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Ireland, and Island of Teneriffe). Motto—Virtus probata florescit. Blazon: Azure a lion ramp, or, between three pheons argent. Crest—A dexter arm in armour embowed, holding a lance transfixing a stag's head couped all proper.
Notes: (Ireland, and Island of Teneriffe). Motto—Virtus probata florescit. Blazon: Azure a lion ramp, or, between three pheons argent. Crest—A dexter arm in armour embowed, holding a lance transfixing a stag's head couped all proper.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
9. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111