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Origin, Meaning, Family History and Core Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Core Origin:

England, France, Germany

Origin of Core:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the surname, this name is listed with many spelling forms in English such as Hubert, Hubart, Hobart, and in French as Hubert, Hubaud, Hubeau, Hubeaux, and in German listed as Huber, Huberich, Hubert, and Hueblin. It is a surname that dates before the 7th century of Germanic and Norse origins. It acquires from the particular name Hugibert, a combination of components of words “hug” which means heart, and “beorht” which means shiny or popular, an explanation of which certainly contributed to its past reputation. The name was introduced into Britain as well as in France in the 8th century by Viking attackers, though its first listings anywhere are known to be that of ‘Eudo filius Huberti’ in the Domesday Book of 1086, after the invasions of Norman. The first of recording of the surname being that of Roger Hubert, who appears in the tax rolls of Northumberland in 1199. Pastor John Hubbard moved from London in April 1635, setting out for the new colony of Virginia. He was both one of the first habitants in the New England colonies, and also one of the first students at the fledgling Harvard University, of which after that he became an administrator in 1688. The developmental name of the core is Gore, Gorr, Core and much more.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Corey, Coare, Coore, Corre, Coure, Corea, Corue, Coree, Cuore, Corie.

England:

The name Core was first organized in Essex where Alan atte Gore was one of the first families to be listed in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273. William de Gora from Wiltshire and William de le Gorewege from Cambridgeshire also recorded in the similar rolls. Kirby’s invasion of Somerset was recorded Simon atte Gore and Adam Gorwege.

The origin of surnames during that time became a primary requirement with the introduction of particular taxation. It came to be known as census Tax in England. Surnames all over the country started to develop, with different and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

People with the surname Core had immigrated to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Core settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Core who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Core, who arrived in Virginia in the year 1658. Thomas Core, who came to Virginia in 1662. Mary Core, who landed in Virginia in 1664. Susan Core, who landed in Virginia in 1665 – 1666. Toby Core who landed in Maryland in the year 1665.

Some of the people with the name Core who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Marshall Core, who arrived in Virginia in the year 1701. Jos Core, who landed in Virginia in the year 1705. Joseph Core, Catherine Core, and Grace Core all came to Virginia in the same year in 1714.

Some of the people with the name Core who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Margaret Core, at the age of 21, landed in Maine in the year 1812.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Core: United States 4,278; England 672; Philippines 902; Pakistan 880; Italy 840; Mexico 811; France 355; Uruguay 330; Brazil 859; India 323.

Notable People:

Peter Core was a senior Australian civil servant. Peter Core got his early education at the James Ruse Agricultural High School in New South Wales. Then, he researched for a Master of Finance and a Bachelor of Rural Science from the University of New England.

In the year 1993, Core was selected as Secretary of the Department of Industrial Relations, a promotion from his duty as a Deputy Secretary in the Department of Primary Industries and Energy.

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Bromerton, co. Norfolk). Blazon: Sable on a chevron between three griffins’ heads erased or, as many estoiles gules. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet a griffin’s head between two wings or, each wing charged with three estoiles in pale gules.

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References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 2 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 4 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 5 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
  • 6 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 7 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 8 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
  • 9 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
  • 10 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 11 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 12 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
  • 13 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
  • 14 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
  • 15 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
  • 16 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
  • 17 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
  • 18 Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150