Core Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Core Family Coat of Arms

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Core Coat of Arms Meaning

Core Name Origin & History

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Core Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Core blazon are the chevron, estoile, griffin and wings. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.11The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 15A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]18Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Core Name

Core Origin:

England, France, Germany

Origin of Core:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the surname, this name is listed with many spelling forms in English such as Hubert, Hubart, Hobart, and in French as Hubert, Hubaud, Hubeau, Hubeaux, and in German listed as Huber, Huberich, Hubert, and Hueblin. It is a surname that dates before the 7th century of Germanic and Norse origins. It acquires from the particular name Hugibert, a combination of components of words “hug” which means heart, and “beorht” which means shiny or popular, an explanation of which certainly contributed to its past reputation. The name was introduced into Britain as well as in France in the 8th century by Viking attackers, though its first listings anywhere are known to be that of ‘Eudo filius Huberti’ in the Domesday Book of 1086, after the invasions of Norman. The first of recording of the surname being that of Roger Hubert, who appears in the tax rolls of Northumberland in 1199. Pastor John Hubbard moved from London in April 1635, setting out for the new colony of Virginia. He was both one of the first habitants in the New England colonies, and also one of the first students at the fledgling Harvard University, of which after that he became an administrator in 1688. The developmental name of the core is Gore, Gorr, Core and much more.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Corey, Coare, Coore, Corre, Coure, Corea, Corue, Coree, Cuore, Corie.

England:

The name Core was first organized in Essex where Alan atte Gore was one of the first families to be listed in the Hundredorum Rolls of 1273. William de Gora from Wiltshire and William de le Gorewege from Cambridgeshire also recorded in the similar rolls. Kirby’s invasion of Somerset was recorded Simon atte Gore and Adam Gorwege.

The origin of surnames during that time became a primary requirement with the introduction of particular taxation. It came to be known as census Tax in England. Surnames all over the country started to develop, with different and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

People with the surname Core had immigrated to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Core settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Core who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Core, who arrived in Virginia in the year 1658. Thomas Core, who came to Virginia in 1662. Mary Core, who landed in Virginia in 1664. Susan Core, who landed in Virginia in 1665 – 1666. Toby Core who landed in Maryland in the year 1665.

Some of the people with the name Core who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Marshall Core, who arrived in Virginia in the year 1701. Jos Core, who landed in Virginia in the year 1705. Joseph Core, Catherine Core, and Grace Core all came to Virginia in the same year in 1714.

Some of the people with the name Core who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Margaret Core, at the age of 21, landed in Maine in the year 1812.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Core: United States 4,278; England 672; Philippines 902; Pakistan 880; Italy 840; Mexico 811; France 355; Uruguay 330; Brazil 859; India 323.

Notable People:

Peter Core was a senior Australian civil servant. Peter Core got his early education at the James Ruse Agricultural High School in New South Wales. Then, he researched for a Master of Finance and a Bachelor of Rural Science from the University of New England.

In the year 1993, Core was selected as Secretary of the Department of Industrial Relations, a promotion from his duty as a Deputy Secretary in the Department of Primary Industries and Energy.

Core Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Bromerton, co. Norfolk). Blazon: Sable on a chevron between three griffins' heads erased or, as many estoiles gules. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet a griffin's head between two wings or, each wing charged with three estoiles in pale gules.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
11. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
15. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
18. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150