Corn Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Corn Family Coat of Arms

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Corn Coat of Arms Meaning

Corn Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Corn. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Corn Coat of Arms Meaning

The main device (symbol) in the Corn blazon is the lion. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, azure and gules .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.5The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 11A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Corn Name

It appears to be an early Huguenot name acquiring from the Olde French “corne” itself coming from the late Latin “corna” meaning “horn” and originally given as a metonymic professional name to a worker in horn, or perhaps a horn-blower.  Horn was a commonly used material in the Middle Ages for the making of small artifacts. The surname well noted in London church Records as Coorn, Corne and Corn from the mid 16th Century onwards. More common variations are: Corin, Corne, Coran, Coren, Coron, Cornu, Chorn, Coryn, Courn, Corny.

The surname Corn first appeared in Yorkshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor.  The Saxon rule of English history declined after the Battle of Hastings in 1066 as the language of the courts was French for the next three centuries, and the Norman ambience predominated. The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Rychard Coorn, dated 1543, at Margaret, Westminister, London. It was during the reign of King V111, who was known as “Good King Hal” dated 1509-1547.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the people with the name Corn who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Gerrit Corn settled with his wife and child in New York state in 1659.  Gerrit Corn, who arrived in New Netherland(s) in 1659. Some of the people with the surname Corn who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included James Corn, aged 22, who landed in Mobile County, Ala in 1839.  Anthny Corn, who landed in Tippecanoe County, Ind in 1844.  Mr Corn, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1851.

Corn Family Gift Ideas

Browse Corn family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Per pale azure and gules a lion rampant, double queued argent.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
11. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60