Covert Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Covert Family Coat of Arms

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Covert Coat of Arms Meaning

Covert Name Origin & History

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Covert Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Covert blazon are the marlet, leopard’s face and fesse. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, or and gules .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.7The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Covert Name

Covert Origin:

France, England

Origins of Covert:

The surname of Covert was said to originate from the country of France, but soon gained popularity within the country of England. By the end of the 17th Century, the surname of Covert was found throughout the country of England. The surname of Covert is said to be a Huguenot, or refugee, surname within the country of England. The origin of the surname of Covert is said to be a topographical surname, most likely found within the country of France. A topographical surname is used to describe someone who lived on or near a residential landmark. This landmark could be either man made or natural, and would have been easily identifiable in the area from which it hailed, thus making the people who lived near it easily distinguished. In the case of the surname of Covert, the surname itself was probably given to someone who lived on or near a sheltered bay. The word itself derives from the French word of “couvert” which can be translated to mean “wood” or “covert” which is said to have derived from the Latin word of “cooperio” which can be translated to mean “to cover.” The surname of Covert is also said to be a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Covert, there was a specific village called “Couve” which was in the Cotes du Nord of France.

Variations:

More common variations are: Couvert, Coovert, Coevert, Coveart, Coverta, Coverty, Covertt, Coverot, Coavert

History:

France:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Covert can be traced to the country of France. One person by the name of Marie Couve, who was the daughter of Henri Couve, was mentioned in the Church Registers for the church of St. Jacque Angers, which is located in Maine et Loire, France. This baptism occurred on December 1, 1634, under the reign of one King Louis XIII, who was also a House of Bourbon Monarch, and who ruled from the year of 1610 to the year of 1643.

England:

Within the country of England, one person by the name of Joseph Couve, who was the son of Jacque Couve was baptized at Spitalfields, London in the year of 1724, and one Thomas Couves, who was baptized at St. Paul’s Church, Depford in 1801.

United States of America:

Many European citizens migrated to the United States of America in the 17th and 18th centuries, in search of a new life for them and their families. This movement of people was known as the European Migration. Among those who migrated was one William Covert, who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year of 1664.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Covert: United States 9,593; Canada 467; Fiji 97; France 86; England 32; Belgium 22; Australia 6; Malaysia 2; Netherlands 2; India 1

Notable People:

Eugene Edzards Covert (born in 1926) who was an aeronautics specialist from America.

Mark Covert (born in 1950) who was a runner from America.

James Way Covert (1842-1910) who was a United States Representative from the state of New York.

John Covert (1882-1960) who was a painter from America.

Allen Stephen Covert (born in 1964) who is an actor, writer, comedian, and producer from America.

Mrs. Farris Covert, who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Wyoming in the year of 1952, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Mrs. Dean Covert, who served as the Vice-chair of the Wyoming Democratic Party in the year of 1943, and who served as an Alternate Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Wyoming in the year of 1944, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Charles G. Covert (1863-1953) who served as the Sheriff and the Mayor of Evansville, Indiana from the year of 1901 to the year of 1906, and who served as the Postmaster at Evansville, Indiana from the year of 1906 to the year of 1910, and again from the year of 1923 to the year of 1933, and who was also a newspaper editor and Republican politician from America.

Covert Family Gift Ideas

Browse Covert family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Kent, Surrey, and Sussex; descended from John Covert, who had a command at the siege of Boulogne in 1558). Blazon: Gules a fesse ermine between three martlets or. Crest— A leopard's face or (another, a lion's face or).

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse