Craigie Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Craigie Family Coat of Arms

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Craigie Coat of Arms Meaning

Craigie Name Origin & History

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Craigie Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Craigie blazon are the crescent, chevron and cornucopia. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.12The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

There are occaisional examples of mythical beings or objects illustrated in a coat of arms, either as an image upon the shield, or as a supporter, and the Cornucopia is an example of this. Any meaning must really be ascribed from the charateristics of that object, nothing additional is added through their heraldic use. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P124 It is illustrated in conventional form as the horn of plenty. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornucopia

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Craigie Name

Craigie Origin:

England

Origins of Craigie:

Listed in many spellings including Craigie, Craighead, Craghead, Craighall, and perhaps Craighill, Craghill, and Cragell, this is a difficult surname of Scottish, and probably sometimes, English origins. It is clearly locational and means in the Gaelic “rocky place,” to which has added many Olde English suffixes like slope or hill, and confusingly hall. It was considered that the spelling as Craighall was considered as starting from the lands of Craigie, now Craighall in West Lothian. It is also similar that name ancestors in the spelling of Craighill, Craghill, and Cragell, may have a similar origin. However, there is a place called Craighill in Perthshire, although there is no proof that any name ancestors started from this hamlet. As Craigie, the name acquires from the above place, or from another estate known as the lands of Craigie in Ayrshire, with John de Cragyn noted as giving homage to the republican government of Scotland in 1296. As Craighead, the name perhaps acquires from Craighead in Lanarkshire, but the first record was from Aberdeen in 1613 when William Craigheid noted as being a baker.

Variations:

More common variations are: Cragie, Craige, Crigie, Graigie, Craggie, Craigio, Caragie, Carigie, Criagie, Craigii.

England:

The surname Craigie first appeared in Ayrshire, previously a division in the southwestern Strathclyde period of Scotland, that today makes up the Cabinet Areas of South, East, and North Ayrshire.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Craigie had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Craigie landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Craigie who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included James Craigie, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1729. James Craigie who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1729. Margaret Craigie settled in Savannah Georgia in 1774.

The following century saw more Craigie surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Craigie who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included David Craigie, who landed in America from Collingworth, in 1903. Fanny Craigie, who landed in America from Manchester, in 1906. Geo. Craigie, who moved to the United States from Glasgow, in 1906. Alexander E. Craigie, aged 23, who settled in America from Montrose, Scotland, in 1909. Edith Craigie, who moved to America from Liverpool, England, in 1911.

Canada:

People with the surname Craigie settled in Canada in 20th Some of the people with the surname Craigie who came to Canada in the 20th century included Alexander Craigie, who moved to Halifax, Nova Scotia, in 1916.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Craigie who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Helen Craigie arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Rajasthan” in 1838. Thomas Craigie arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Adelaide.” John Craigie arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “William Hammond.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Craigie: England 839; Australia 758; United States 620; Scotland 486; Canada 339; South Africa 292; New Zealand 258; Ireland 82; Spain 9; Zimbabwe 5.

Notable People:

Claude Craigie was a Scottish football player.

Craigie Family Gift Ideas

Browse Craigie family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Kilgraston, co. Perth). Motto—Honeste vivo. Per pale az. and sa. a chev. ar. betw. three crescents or.
2) (Dumbarnie, co. Perth). Motto—Honeste vivo. (The heiress Anne, dan. of John Craigie, of Dumbarnie, Esq., one of the Lords Justiciary in Scotland, by Susan his wife, eldest dau. of Sir John Inglis, Bart., to. Charles Halkett, Esq., of Hall Hill, co. Fife). Per pale az. and sa. a chev. engr. ar. betw. three crescents or.
3) (Glendoick, and later family of Dumbarnie). Motto—Honeste vivo. Per pale sa. and az. on a chev. erm. betw. three crescents or, a cross moline of the first. Crest—A cornucopia ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
12. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P124
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cornucopia