Cranford Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Cranford Family Coat of Arms

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Cranford Coat of Arms Meaning

Cranford Name Origin & History

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Cranford Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Cranford blazon are the fret, chief indented and lion passant. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The fret is a striking charge, often occupying the whole of the field and being two instersecting diagonal lines interlaced with the outline of a square. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret It is believed to be derived from the image of a fishing net, which it does indeed resemble, and hence Wade believes that it should signify persuasion, although other writers regard it separately as the “the heraldic true lovers knot” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P118

The chief is a separate area across the top of the field 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It is normally marked by a straight line of partition, but for artistic effect, and for clarity of difference between coats of arms, heralds have developed a series of decorative patterns to be used along the edge. An line drawn indented, i.e. in a saw-tooth pattern might be taken for dancettee, but in this case the individual “teeth” are much smaller. An early author, Guilllim seeks to associate this decoration with fire 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P39, and one can see the resemblance to flames. The visual effect is quite striking, an good example being the arms of DUNHAM (Lincolnshire), which are Azure, a chief indented or.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Cranford Name

Cranford Origin:

England

Origins of Cranford:

The surname of Cranford hails from the country of England, and is considered to be a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Cranford, there were many villages and towns with the name of Cranford throughout the country of England. The most common location from which the surname of Cranford hailed was found as a parish in the county of Northampton, England.

Variations:

More common variations are: Craniford, Crainford, Crawnford, Crannford, Chranford, Cranfourd, Cranaford, Crannfford, Caranford, Crannaford, Cornford, Cranfurd, Carnford, Crinford

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Cranford can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Geoffrey de Cranford was recorded as residing in the county of Northampton in the year of 1273. This recorded occurred under the reign of one King Edward I of England, who was commonly referred to throughout the ages as one “Edward Longshanks,” but was also known as one “The Hammer of the Scots,” and was thus named for the trials and tribulations that he imposed upon the people of Scotland throughout his rule. King Edward I of England ruled from the year of 1272 to the year of 1307. Other mentions of the surname of Cranford within the country of England include one John de Cranford, who was mentioned as residing in the county of Northampton in the year of 1327, while one John de Cranford was mentioned as living in the county of Yorkshire in the year of 1379, and was recorded in the Poll Tax of the county of Yorkshire. Those who bear the surname of Cranford within the country of England can be found in large concentrations in the counties of Yorkshire, Northampton, and within the areas in and around the city of London.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th century, it became popular for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America, which was then known as the New World, or the Colonies. These citizens were often displeased with the state of the governments within their home countries, and thus moved to the United States of America in search of a new and better life for them and their families. The United States of America promised freedom from religious persecution, the ability to create an autonomous government, the ability to own land, and better living conditions for all who migrated to the New World. This large movement of people to the United States of America was known as the European Migration. Among those who migrated to the United States of America were people who bore the surname of Cranford. The first person to bring this surname of Cranford to the United States of America was one John Cranford, who arrived in Virginia in the year of 1653.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Cranford: United States 8,824; Canada 343; England 167; Scotland 20; Australia 9; New Zealand 7; Costa Rica 4; China 4; Czech Republic 3; Japan 3; Honduras 2; Germany 2; Netherlands 2

Notable People:

Clarence Cranford (1906-2003) who as a Baptist pastor, author, and church leader from America.

Bob Cranford, who was a harmonica player and vocalist from America.

Ronald Eugene Cranford (1941-2006) who was an expert on the unconscious mind and comas, and who was also a neurologist from America.

Michael Cranford, who was a former game programmer from America, and who was also a software engineer.

John Walter Cranford (1862-1899) who was a U.S. Representative from Texas.

Roland Cranford, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Mississippi in the year of 1936, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

L.B. Cranford, who served as the Candidate for the U.S. Representative from the state of Texas in the 3rd District in the year of 1922.

John Walter Cranford (1859-1899) who served as a Member of the Texas State Senate from the year of 1889 to the year of 1894, and who served as the U.S. Representative from the state of Texas in the 4th District from the year of 1897 to the year of 1899.

Cranford Family Gift Ideas

Browse Cranford family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (South Newton, co. Northampton). Ar. a chief indented az.
2) (co. Warwick, confirmed in the pedigree of Catesby, as the Arms of Cranford. John Catesby, of Ledbrooke, in. Emma, dau. of William Cranford. Visit. Warwick). Gu. a fret or, a chief ar.
3) Same Arms. Crest—An eagle with wings expanded ppr. supporting a flag az.
4) Or, two lions pass. sa. crowned of the field.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P118
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P39
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61