Creed Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Creed Family Coat of Arms

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Creed Coat of Arms Meaning

Creed Name Origin & History

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Creed Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Creed blazon are the leopard’s face, chevron and estoile. The two main tinctures (colors) are ermine and gules.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.10The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

There were of course many widely recognised symbols that existed long before the advent of heraldry and it should be no surprise that some of these were adopted as charge in coats of arms 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301. The estoile is a typical example, reflecting the stars in the sky and represented with six wavy points, often with a little shading to give it some depth. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile. The ancient writer Guillim assigns these symbols as the emblems of God’s goodness”. 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Creed Name

This interesting surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is locational from a place so called in Cornwall, and means “(the church of) St. Creda or Crida”, named after a 7th Century female priest who considered to have come from Ireland. More common variations are: Creedy, Creede, Creedo, Coreed, Creeda, Cred, Creedey, Careedy, Creedee, Creedeu.

The surname Creed first appeared in Cornwall Where they held a family seat from very early times, some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD. The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Wadin Crede, dated 1191, in the “ Pipe Rolls of Warwickshire”. It was during the reign of King Richard 1, who was known as King Richard 1, dated 1189-1199.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Some of the people with the name Creed who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Creed, who arrived in Virginia in 1662.  Edward Creed, who settled in Virginia in 1663.  Edward Creed, who arrived in Maryland in 1670.  John Creed, who landed in Maryland in 1670.  Jonathon Creed, who came to Barbados in 1679 with his wife and daughter. People with the surname Creed who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Mathew Creed, who landed in Virginia in 1714. Some of the people with the surname Creed who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Penelope Creed who arrived in New York in 1820. Some of the people with the name Creed who arrived in the Canada in the 19th century included William Creed, aged 16, a clerk, who arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in 1833 aboard the brig “Charity” from Kinsale, Ireland.   Some of the individuals with the surname Creed who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Mary Creed, aged 19, who arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Elgin”.

Creed Family Gift Ideas

Browse Creed family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Sarum, co. Wilts, granted 4 June, 1663). Erm. on a chev. engr. sa. three leopards’ faces or.
2) (London). Erm. on a chev. sa. cotised gu. betw. three estoiles of the last as many leopards’ faces or. Crest—A dove with an olive branch ppr.
3) Same Arms, the field ar. Crest—A demi wolf reguard. erminois holding in the dexter paw an estoile gu.
4) Per pale sa. and gu. on a chev. engr. per pale or, and erm. three leopards’ faces of the second. Crest—On an oak branch vert a dove ar. with a sprig in his beak ppr. charged on the breast with a cross pattee gu.
5) (All Saints, Barnwell, co. Northampton. Arms from the monument of Dorothy, dau. of John Creed, Esq., of Oundle, ob. 1714). Az. a chev. betw. three swans ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
10. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P301
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Estoile
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P77