Creasy Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Creasy Family Coat of Arms

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Creasy Coat of Arms Meaning

Creasy Name Origin & History

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Creasy Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Creasy blazon are the escallop and greyhound’s head. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

Dogs of all breeds are common in heraldry and are largely depicted in a realistic fashion for that species. The obviously have a role as “man’s best friend” and can demonstrate a passion for the pursuit of hunting, but may also occur as a play on words with the family name. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:dog (and others) Wade suggests that all dogs, of whatever breed should be taken as tokens of their “courage, vigilancy, and loyal fidelity”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Creasy Name

Creasy Origin:

England

Origin of Creasy:

The surname Creasy has two possible origins. The first is probably from an Anglo-Saxon origin, from the Olde English word “creas,” derived from Middle English word “crease,” which means “fashionable or beautiful,” which was a love name used for a beautiful person or someone who dressed in a beautiful way or fashionable clothes. The name may also be of an ancient French origin, from “Crecy” in Seine-Inferieure, (spelled as “Cressy,” in Middle English) which was the opinion of the war in the year 1346, among the Hundred Years battle, when the English conquered the French. The surname was first introduced at the end of 12th Century, when one Hugo de Creissi was listed in the Pipe Rolls of Lancashire in 1171. One Alexander de Crecy was recorded in 1182 in the “Transcripts of documents relating to the Gilbertine Houses,” and Richard le Cres was recorded in the Norfolk Hundred Rolls in 1275. The name may also appear as Cressy, Crease, Creasy, Creasey and Crees, while Creasey itself was spread widely in Suffolk. Thomas, son of Thomas and Joane Creasey, was named at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, London in December 1646.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Creasey, Creassy, Creasay, Creascy, Creas, Cresy, Crasy, Creassey, Crease, Cressy.

England:

The name Creasy first organized in Norfolk at Beeston Regis, a church, in the union of Erpingham, Hundred of North Erpingham. “Here are some survives, containing mainly the west end of the parish, with a small tower, and a portion of the chapter-house, of a ministry of Augustine canons, created in the period of John by Lady Isabel de Cressey, and the location of which, at the Division, was $50. 6. 4”. Hugh de Cressy passed away in the year 1189, was an Anglo-Norman businessman and gentleman. Sadly, little more is known about both people.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Cenric Cres of Suffolk, which was dated near the year 1095, in the “The Feudal records from the Abbey of Bury St. Edmunds”. It was during the time of King William II, who was known to be the “The Rufus,” 1087 – 1100. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the surname Creasy who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included George Creasy at the age of 13, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Collingwood” in 1875. George Creasy arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Wairoa” in 1880

Here is the population distribution of the last name Creasy: United States 4,063; England 683; China 8; Czech Republic 4; Ukraine 4; Australia 145; Scotland 39; Canada 245; South Africa 73; New Zealand 62.

Notable People:

Edward Shepherd Creasy (1812–1878), was an English professor and barrister. He was born in Bexley, England.

George Creasy (1895–1972), was a great officer of the Royal Navy. After serving as a junior commander in the First World War, among which he took part in Heligoland Bight in 1917.

Gerald Creasy (1897–1983), was a British colonial officer. He gave services as head of the Gold Coast and Malta.

Kenneth Creasy (1932–1992), was an American political leader. He was also a representative of the Ohio House of Representatives. He was raised in Turkey Creek, Kentucky, the oldest son of a coal miner.

Robert Creasy (1939–2005), was an American expert in computer science.

Sara Creasy is an Australian author introduced by Kristin Nelson, administrator of the Nelson Agency out of Denver, CO. She was born and grew up in England before her family shifted to Australia when she was a young girl. Her introductory novel, Song of Scarabaeus, was released by Harper.

Stella Creasy (born 1977), is a famous British leader of laborers.

Wynn Creasy (born 1957), is an American artist, who lives in Alexandria, Virginia. She is famous for her sceneries of the remote areas of Virginia, and her use of different color in oil.

Creasy Family Gift Ideas

Browse Creasy family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: None. Blazon: Or, five escallops in cross gu. Crest—A greyhound's head sa. collared ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:dog (and others)
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69