Dalby Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Dalby Family Coat of Arms

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Dalby Coat of Arms Meaning

Dalby Name Origin & History

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Dalby Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Dalby blazon are the barry wavy and buckle. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and gules.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

When the field of the shield is filled with alternately coloured horizontal lines, this is known as barry, obviously because it is like having many separate bars across the field 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry. As well as being drawn with straight edges, there some decorative effects that can be used, and, with careful, these can be very pleasing. The decorations are typically much smaller than those used on the major ordinaries, such as the fess so care must be taken to ensure clarity. The decorative edge pattern Wavy, sometimes written as undy is, for obvious reasons, associated with both water and the sea 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40. Indeed, a roundel with alternating bars of azure and argent (blue and white) is known by the shorthand term fountain, representing water at the bottom of a well 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water. Other colours have also been used and the result can be very pleasing to the eye.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 The buckle may fall into this category, it is present in a surprising number of different forms and has a long heritage in use, 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle being considered honourable bearings and are said to “signify victorious fidelity in authority”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Dalby Name

Dalby Origin:

England

Origins of Dalby:

This interesting name is of Old Norse origin and is a geographical surname acquiring from any one of the places called Dalby, in Lincolnshire, near Spilsby in Leicestershire near Melton Mowbray, and in North Yorkshire near Terrington. All three places were noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Dalbi,” and all give the similar meaning and origin, which is “the farm in the Dale,” from the Old Norse “dalr,” which means valley, with “byr,” which means farm, village. The surname first appeared most regularly in Yorkshire, and therefore perhaps acquires originally from Dalby in that division. The geographical surname was mostly derived by those old residents of a place who had shifted to another place and were best recognized by the name of their original home. The new surname can appear as Dalby, Dalbey, Daulby, and the obviously Norman form D’ Aulby. According to the documentations of the name in Yorkshire is that of the naming of Thomas Dalby, son of Richard, at Brandesburton, in May 1585.

Variations:

More common variations are: Daulby, Dalbey, Dahlby, Dalbay, Dalboy, Dalbye, Dealby, Dalhby, Dualby, Dalaby.

England:

The origins of the surname Dalby appeared in Lancashire where people held a family seat from old times. Someone say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Matthew de Dalbi, dated about 1160, in the “Documents relating to the Danelaw,” Huntingdonshire. It was during the time of King Henry II who was known to be the “The Builder of Churches,” dated 1154-1189. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varietions of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Dalby had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Dalby landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Dalby who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included William Dalby, who landed in Virginia in 1622. Ann Dalby, who landed in Maryland in 1675. John Dalby settled in Virginia in 1679. Thomas Dalby landed in Maryland in 1684.

People with the surname Dalby who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Susan Dalby settled in Maryland in 1736.

The following century saw much more Dalby surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Dalby who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Joseph Dalby, who arrived in New York in 1837.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Dalby who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Catherine Dalby arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship “William Stuart.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Dalby who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included H Dalby landed in New Plymouth, New Zealand in 1841 aboard the ship Amelia Thompson.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Dalby: England 3,393; United States 2,003; Denmark 915; Australia 730; France 502; Canada 473; Norway 466; Philippines 258; South Africa 237; Scotland 197.

Notable People:

Amy Dalby is a British actress.

Andrew Dalby was a Culinary author.

Andy Dalby is a famous guitarist.

Dave Dalby was an NFL football player.

Chris Dalby was a political writer.

David Dalby was a British scholar and creator of Linguasphere Observatory.

Graham Dalby is a British Band Leader of The London Swing Orchestra.

Greg Dalby was an American soccer player.

Liza Dalby was an American anthropologist and author.

Mark Dalby (1938–2013), was a British Anglican Archdeacon.

Martin Dalby is a Scottish writer.

Nicolas Dalby was a Danish mixed military artist.

Robert Dalby was an English saint.

Dalby Family Gift Ideas

Browse Dalby family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Castle Donnington, co. Leicester, settled there for several centuries). (co. Warwick). Barry wavy of six or and gu. Crest—A demi griffin segreant ppr. Motto—In Deo spero.
2) Same Arms. Crest—A demi Hercules, lion’s skin and club issuing from the wreath.
3) (Exton, co. Rutland; Roger, son of William Flower, Sheriff of Rutland, 10 Richard II., m. Katherine, dau. and co-heir of William Daleye. Her. Visit. 1618). Ar. a bend engr. and a canton sa.
4) Gu. a chev. erm. betw. three round buckles or.
5) Az. a chief and bordure or.
6) Ar. two chevs. engr. and a canton sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P40
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Water
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Buckle
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P115