Dale Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Dale Family Coat of Arms

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Dale Coat of Arms Meaning

Dale Name Origin & History

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Dale Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Dale blazon are the hawk, torteaux and swan. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The falcon is a bird long associated with hunting and we need look no further than a liking for this pursuit for its presence on many early coats of arms. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon We also find many of the accessories used in falconry depicted on arms, and a surprising number of terms from the art of falconry have found use in modern English idioms and the interested reader is recommended to search out the origins of the phrases hoodwinked and “cadging” a lift.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and torteau is a roundle gules, or red. (We must be careful however not to confuse this with the word in French heraldry, in which torteau means roundle and must have the colour specified.) Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

Wade suggests that the appearance of a swan in a coat of arms is perhaps an indication of a musical person, or a “ lover of poetry and harmony”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78 It is generally shown in a lifelike aspect and colouring, although it may be leaked and legged with other colours. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan. It is a popular charge, both on the shield itself and impress, sometimes sitting and sometimes rising as if about to take off in flight. 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Dale Name

the areas of Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, and in Ayrshire counties.

United States of America:

Within the United States of America, those who bear the surname of Dale can be found throughout the country. The original bearers of the surname of Dale settled in the states of New York, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Illinois, Texas, Virginia, Maryland and in the state of Tennessee.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Dale: United States 35,655; England 17,585; Australia 6,512; India 5,355; Canada 4,475; Norway 3,443; South Africa 2,940; Philippines 2,449; Brazil 1,828; New Zealand 1,366

Notable People:

Alan Dale (1925-2002) who was a singer of both traditional popular music, and rock and roll music who hailed from the United States of America

James Badge Dale (born in 1978) who is an actor who is most notably recognized for his portrayal of Chase Edmund in the 3rd season of the American television series 24, which spanned 8 seasons, who was born in the United States of America

Shana Dale (born in 1964) who is a lawyer who served as the Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from the year 2005 to the year 2009, and who was a politician from the United States of America

Alan Hugh Dale (born in 1947) who is an actor from the country of New Zealand

Cynthia Dale (born in 1961) who is a stage performer and TV actress from the country of Canada

Sir Henry Hallet Dale OM, GBE, PRS (1875-1968) who was a pharmacologist from the country of England

Jim Dale MBE (born in 1935) who was an actor, singer, songwriter, and voice artist from the country of England

Dale Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Brentwood, co. Essex). Sa. on a chev. or, betw. three hawks rising ar. beaked, legged, and belled of the second, five torteaux.
2) (London, and co. Northampton, 1613). Gu. on a mount vert a swan ar. membered and ducally gorged or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a heron ar. beaked, legged, and ducally gorged or.
3) (cos. Northumberland and York). Gu. a swan, wings expanded ar. Crest—A stork ppr.
4) (co. Rutland; confirmed 1602). Paly of six ar. and gu. on a chief az. three garbs or. Crest—Three Danish battle-axes erect, handles or, headed ar. enfiled with a chaplet of roses gold.
5) (co. Surrey). Ar. on a bend sa. three hinds pass. or.
6) Ar. two lions pass. in pale az.
7) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Off. Matthew Dale, of Greenwood Hail, parish of Stoke, co. Essex, d. 5 May, 1614, buried in St. Andrew’s Church, Dublin). Ar. on a bend sa. three talbots (another, wolves) courant of the field, armed and langued gu. Crest—A naked arm embowed, holding a sword bendways ppr.
8) (Glanvilles-Wotton House, co. Dorset). Az. three buglehorns. Crest—A garb ppr.
9) Ar. three pallets gu.
10) (David Dale, Esq., of Darlington, co. Durham). Az. a swan ar. betw. four bezants saltirewise. Crest—In front of two eagles’ heads erased and addorsed ppr. an escutcheon az. charged with a bezant.
11) (Bristowe; Henry Dale of that place, John Dale, citizen of London, and Mathew Dale, a judge in Guildhall, in 1612, sons of Mathew Dale, the son of William Dale, of Bristow. Her. Visit.). Sa. on a chev. or, betw. three cranes rising ar. seven torteaux.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245