Darlington Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Darlington Family Coat of Arms

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Darlington Coat of Arms Meaning

Darlington Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Darlington. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Darlington Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Darlington blazon are the leopard’s head, cross crosslet and winged pillar. The three main tinctures (colors) are guttee deau, or and gules .

The gutte or goutte is an elongated tear-drop shape with wavy sides and usually appears in large number spread evenly across the field. 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gouttes Some frequently do they occur that special names have arisen for the various colours, guttee d’eau being argent (or white) for its obvious resemblence to drops of water.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.5The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The leopard’s face (sometimes, incorrectly referred to as a leopard’s head occurs very frequently in heraldry 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion. Early heraldic artists tended to treat lions and leopards as the same animal, but during the development of British Heraldry the heads of the two creatures have adopted separate, and more realistic forms. Wade would have us associate leopards with warriors, especially those who overcome ”hazardous things by force and courage” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

The Pillar, according to Wade symbolises “fortitude and constancy”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P101 Typically the pillar is a plain column with simple cushion capitals but architecture fans will be pleased to know that other orders (doric, ionic etc.) can be specified! 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:PillarsThe winged pillar is also sometimes found but can be assumed to have similar significance

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Darlington Name

Darlington Origin:

England

Origins of Darlington:

This interesting and unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a regional name from the market-town and church of Darlington near Stockton-on-Tees, Durham. Listed as “Dearthingtun” near the year 1050 in the “Historia de S. Cuthberto”; as “Dearningtun” in an Ecclesiastical History of Durham, dated 1104. “Derlington” in the year 1196, the place was so named from the Olde English pre 7th Century “Deornothingtun”, agreement of Deornoth’s people, from “tun”, which means courtyard, agreement, with “ing”, which means people of, and the male name “Deornoth”, combination of the components “Dear”, and “noth”, which means dearest. Regional surnames, like this, were frequently given to local land holders, and the king of the castle, and ultimately as a source of recognition to those who left their mother town to settle another place. The surname was first found on the list in Scotland, and Johan de Derlingtone, priest of the parish of Dunlopy, Forfarshire, performed a duty to the King of England in 1296. A previous remarkable bearer of the name was John of Darlington, a Dominican priest. He was a blessed priest of Dublin in 1279. In May 1572, Thomas Darlington and Ellen Walker married at Whitegate, Cheshire.

Variations:

More common variations are: Darlingtone, Darlingtton, Darllington, Dearlingtone, Darlingtonii, Tarlington, Derlington, Dorlington, Darlungton, Darlingten.

England:

The origins of the surname Darlington found in Durhan, a market-town and church, and the chief of a union, in the S.E. County of Darlington ward.” This place, the name of which is of Saxon derivation, is of imaginable history, and towards the near of the 10th century was, given by Seir.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ada de Derlingtun, dated about 1281, in the “Registrum episcopatus Moraviensis ,” Scotland. It was during the time of King Alexander of Scotland dated 1249-1286. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as the Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Darlington had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Darlington settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Darlington who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Abraham and John Darlington arrived in Pennsylvania in 1711. James Darlington landed in Maryland in 1739.

The following century saw many more Darlington surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Darlington who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Joseph Darlington arrived in Philadelphia in the year 1856.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Darlington who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Charles Darlington who was an English prisoner from Manchester, who shifted aboard the ship “Anna Maria’ in October 1851, coming in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. Charles Darlington at the age of 22, landed in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Epaminondas.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Darlington who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Darlington at the age of 23 and Ellen at the age of 21; both arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “ Eveline” in the same year 1865.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Darlington: United States 3,532; England 3,581 Australia 928; Canada 652; South Africa 493; Zambia 1,054; Uganda 1,867; Cameroon 496; Ghana 3,275; Nigeria 31,178.

Notable People:

Adam de Darlington or Darlingtun was a 13th-century English priest who lived in Scotland.

Charles Darlington, (1901–1986) was a U.S. agent to Gabon.

Christy Darlington, (b. 1972) is an American singer.

C. D. Darlington, (1903–1981), was an English botanist.

Ian Darlington, (b. 1977), is an English cricket player.

Jeff Darlington, (b. 1981) is an American sports composer.

Jermaine Darlington, (b. 1974) is an English association football player.

Jonathan Darlington, (b, 1956) is a British conductor.

Kevin Darlington, (b. 1972) is a Guyana-born American cricket player.

Ralph Darlington, (b. the 1960s) is a Professor of financial settlements at the University of Salford, England.

Sidney Darlington, (1906–1997) was an American electrical engineer.

Darlington Family Gift Ideas

Browse Darlington family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: None. Blazon: Az. guttde d’eau on a fesse betw. three leopards’ heads erased or, as many crosses crosslet gu. Crests—1st: A leopard's head as in the arms; 2nd: A winged pillar supporting a globe. Motto—Cruce dum spiro spero.
2) Notes: None. Blazon: Az. guttee d’eau on a fesse or, three crosses crosslet gu. Crest—A winged pillar.
3) Notes: None. Blazon: Same Arms, adding in chief a leopard’s face of the second.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gouttes
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P65
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P101
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pillars