Dominick Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Dominick Family Coat of Arms

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Dominick Coat of Arms Meaning

Dominick Name Origin & History

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Dominick Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Dominick blazon are the chevron, lion, naval crown and stag. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, ermine and or .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.11The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 15Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 16A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Crowns are frequently observed in Heraldry 18Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184, but we should not make the mistake of assuming that these are always on Royal arms 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138. Many of the orders of nobility across Europe were entitled to wear crowns and coronets, Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons in England each had their own distinctive headwear 20A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350. The naval crown is an example of this. It may also be the case that a crown is added to an existing coat of arms as an augmentation in recognition of some service to a King 21Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Dominick Name

Dominick Origin:

Spain

Origin of Dominick:

This surname is listed with almost two hundred and fifty spellings and found all over the western world, this very famous name is noted as being of old Spanish origin. It derives from the Roman Latin word “Dominicus”, which means “attachment to the superior God,” and from “Dominus,” which means superior or skillful. The name provided an impression of the motivation of the Spanish martyr “Dominicus”, who organized the Dominican system of priests. The addition of components “ez” or “es” when they occur are nicknames; they derive from the Latin word “icus” and mention “son of”. Surnames derived from particular names are the most ancient of surnames, and in the Christian world are frequently combined with the twelve “Crusades” when different European kings lead a journey to try to take the Holy land, and especially Jerusalem, from the Muslims. As a result of the expedition, it became modern in Europe to name children, especially sons, after religious characters. Recordings of the surname taken from civil and religious documents consist of Ambrosio Domingues, at Chiclana, Cadiz, Spain, in 1537, Fernando Dominguez, born at Jerez de la Fronterna, Cadiz, in 1544. Dennys Dominicus, who was buried at St James Parish, Clerkenwell, London, in 1576, and the wedding of Blas Dominguez to Catalina de Balbuena, at Santa Maria Magdalena, Valladolid, on January. The royal monogram related with the name has the blazon of a green shield, embellished with two golden pillars combined at the center by a black chain, and exceeded by a black eagle.

Variations:

More common variations are: Dominicko, Dominiack, Dominicky, Dominieck, Domianick, Dominaick, Dominicke, Doominick, Domminick, Dominnick.

England:

Robert Domenyk was listed in the Calendar of Letter Books of London in 1405.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Dominicus de Buketon, dated 1326, in the register of England known as “The fines Roll.” It was during the time of King Edward II who was known to be the “Edward of Caernafon,” 1307 – 1327. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Dominick settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Dominick who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Casper Dominick at the age of 33, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1738. John Dominick, who landed in South Carolina in 1738, and Maria Dominick, who arrived in New York, NY in 1749 and Andreas Dominick who arrived in America in 1752.

Some of the people with the surname Dominick who settled in the United States in the 19th century included James Dominick who arrived in New York, NY in 1830. I Dominick at the age of 25, landed in New Orleans, La in 1850. B Dominick at the age of 29, arrived in New Orleans, La in 1858. Dominick Dominick, who arrived in Iowa in 1885 and Theodore Dominick, who landed in Mississippi in 1895.

Canada:

People with the surname Dominick settled in Canada in the 18th century. Some of the people with the name Dominick who settled in the Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Francis Dommick U.E. who settled in Carleton [Saint John City], New Brunswick about 1784. Mr. Thomas Donaho U.E. who settled in Saint John, New Brunswick about1784.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Dominick: United States 5,353; Tanzania 15,177; Germany 403; Australia 117; Scotland 59; Canada 147; South Africa 347; Brazil 366; Malaysia 152; New Zealand 45.

Notable People:

Dominick Rojelio Cruz (born 1985) is an American mixed martial artist and entertainer.

Dominick Miserandino (born 1972) is an American businessman, writer, and journalist.

Dominick Cafferky (died 1971) was a famous Irish lawmaker.

Dominick John Dunne (1925 – 2009) was an American author, researcher, and composer.

Dominick Muermans (born 1984, in Geleen, Netherlands) is a Dutch racecar driver.

Peter J. Dominick (born 1975) is an American entertainer and talk radio personality.

Dominick Family Gift Ideas

Browse Dominick family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Great Marlow, co. Bucks ; granted 1720). Blazon: Vert three chevron ermine in chief a naval crown between two lions' heads erased or. Crest—A stag sejant or, attired gules gorged with a naval crown of the last, reposing his dexter foot on an antique shield vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
11. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
15. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
16. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138
20. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350
21. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 187