Duller Coat of Arms

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Duller). Ar. on a bend sa. a lion pass. or.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Duller Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Duller Origin:
England

Origins of Duller:
This unusual surname, having long relationships with Buckinghamshire, is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is an interesting example of that sizeable group of early European surnames that gradually created from the habitual use of nicknames.  These nicknames are given in the first example with relating to the profession, or to a variety of personal characteristics, such as physical characteristics or unusualnesses, mental and moral characteristics, or to habits of dress and behavior.  It is an interesting and unique Anglo- Saxon surname.  Spelling variations of this family name contain as Dollard, Dullard, Duller, Ballard and others.

Variations:
More common variations are: Dueller, Dullere, Dulleri, Duiller, Dullery, Duler, Dller, Deller, Daller, Diller.

England:
The surname Duller first appeared in Essex where they held a family seat from early times and their first records appeared on the early census poll derived by the early Kings of Britain to decide the rate of taxation of their problems.  The surname Duller first found in Essex where they held a family seat as Lords of the Estate.  The Saxon rule of English history declined after the Battle of Hastings in 1066.  The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman character prevailed.  But Saxon surnames remained and the family name first mentioned in the year 1231 when Richard Dollard first found.  The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Duller had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Duller landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.    Some of the people with the name Duller who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Duller, who landed in Massachusetts in 1633-1634.  Roger Duller settled in Virginia in 1649.

Some of the people with the surname Duller who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Maurice Duller, who landed in Georgia in 1743.

The following century saw more Duller surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Duller who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included John Duller arrived in New Orleans in 1821.  C. Duller arrived in San Francisco in 1852.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Duller:
Philippines 580; Austria 367; Brazil 191; United States 172; Germany 168; England 156; Netherlands 75; Wales 45; Canada 43; Australia 26.

Notable People:
Eduard Duller (November 1809, Vienna –July 1853, Wiesbaden) was a German-Austrian author and clergyman, very active as a poet, novel writer and later as a professor.

Duller Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Duller blazon are the lion passant and fesse. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and argent .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse