Durrant Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Durrant Family Coat of Arms

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Durrant Coat of Arms Meaning

Durrant Name Origin & History

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Durrant Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Durrant blazon are the fesse dancettee, fleur-de-lis, cross crosslet and boar. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, sable and argent .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. This created an opportunity to add decorative edging to the band, of many forms, and to very pleasing artisitic effect, at least close up – it must be admitted that at distance some of the forms are hard to distinguish! Dancettee (sometimes spelled dancetty or dancy) is a bold, zig-zag pattern, perhaps the most distinctive of the patterned edges. Purists might argue that the French variant denché Is not the same, being of larger size and with the points being 90º, but there is much variation in actual practice so the difference is perhaps not that meaningful.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Durrant Name

Durrant Origin:

France

Origins of Durrant:

This interesting and unique name is of Norman origin, brought into England after the invasion of 1066 as the particular name “Durant”, it is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Durandus”, and acquires from the Olde French “durant” which means “surviving”, from “durer”, to survive, last, itself from the Latin “durus”, which means hard, strong. As a particular name, Durant and Durand were famous in the Middle Ages, listed in the Middle Ages, noted as “Durand” in 1115, Hampshire, “Doraunt” (1312, Yorkshire), and derived to mean “loyal,” and probably “obstinate.” The new surname can appear in at least thirteen different styles, ranging from Durant, Durand, Durrant and Durrand to Dorant, Dorran, and Dorrins. One Nathan Durant was an old traveler in the West Indies; he listed as a land- holder in the Barbadoes in 1678.

Variations:

More common variations are: Durrante, Durriant, Durant, Durrantee, Durrand, Durrent, Darrant, Daurant, Turrant, Dirrant.

England:

The surname Durrant was first found in Warwickshire, Worcestershire, and Salop, where they held a family seat from very early times and were donated estates by Duke William of Normandy, their true King, for their extraordinary service at the invasion of Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Walter Durand, dated about 1196, in the “Pipe Rolls of Westmoreland.” It was during the time of King Richard 1st, who was known to be the “The Lionheart,” dated 1189-1199. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Durrant had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Durrant settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Durrant who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Durrant arrived in Virginia in 1635. Thomas Durrant came with his wife and servants in Barbados in 1680.

Some of the people with the surname Durrant who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Durrant, who settled in Maryland in 1774. Thomas Durrant settled in Maryland in 1774.

The following century saw many more Durrant surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Durrant who settled in the United States in the 19th century included William Durrant arrived in New York in 1846.

Some of the people with the name Durrant who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Horace W Durrant landed in Mississippi in 1905.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Durrant who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Samuel Durrant landed in Canada in 1832.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Durrant who settled in Australia in the 19th century included James Durrant arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Isabella Watson” in 1846. David Durrant arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Branken Moor” in 1849. Jonathan Durrant arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Coromandel.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Durrant who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Durrant arrived in Harbor Nicholson aboard the ship “Gertrude” in 1841. F. Durrant came to Nelson aboard the ship “Golconda” in 1859. James Durran and Mary Durrant, both arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Waimea” in 1876.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Durrant: England 7,582; United States 3,395; South Africa 1,443; Australia 1,294; Canada 840; Jamaica 518; New Zealand 355; Scotland 354; Germany 303; Wales 282.

Notable People:

Andi Durrant (born 1981), is an English radio actor, DJ and music composer.

Devin Durrant (born 1960), is an American retired basketball player.

Ian Durrant (born 1966), is a former Scottish soccer player.

Durrant Family Gift Ideas

Browse Durrant family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Derby). Sa. a fesse dancettee ar. in chief three fleurs-de-lis of the second. Crest—A lion ramp. ar. holding in the dexter paw a fleur-de-lis or, and in the mouth a sword ppr. hilt and pommel of the second, point downwards.
2) (Scottow, co. Norfolk, bart.). Motto—Labes pejor morte. Erm. a cross crosslet sa. Crest—A boar ar. bristled, armed, and langued or, pierced in the side with an arrow.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103