Durward Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Durward Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Durward Coat of Arms Meaning

Durward Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Durward. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

durward coat of arms

Durward Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Durward blazon are the crescent, chevron, gem ring and scymitar. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, or and sable .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.14The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The most common form of household jewelery in heraldry is the ring or gem ring, shown with a jewel which may have a different colour. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:ring Wade, incorrectly terms the annulet a finger ring, but assigns the meaning of “fidelity” to it – more properly this meaning belongs to the gem ring. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P94

Durward Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Durward Name

Durward Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Durward:

This most interesting surname is an English alternative of “Durward” itself found mainly in Scotland. It is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a professional name from the Olde English term “duru-weard”, door-keeper, transporter. In Scotland the office of door-ward to the King was a very important one and in the start of the 13th Century was inherited in the powerful family of “de Lundin”, who moved to Aberdeenshire because of a lengthy discussion between the family and Duncan, Earl of Mar, from whom Thomas de Lundin required the earldom through his mother. The discussion, during which the family had the support of the Scottish Kings William the Lion and Alexander II was settled in 1228 and appeared in the de Lundins or Durwards obtaining an enormous lordship in the dale of the Dee. Alan Durward, son of the first person to take his name from the office, Thomas de Lundyn (circa 1204), was one of the great characters in Scottish history during the 13th Century. He married Marjorie, a natural daughter of Alexander II, and during the opposition of Alexander III was Regent of the kingdom. “Dorward,” famous around Arbroath, is perhaps from the office of door-ward of the Abbey. William Doreward noted in the Pipe Rolls of Hampshire in 1230, and Richard Doreward showed in the Feet of Fines of Essex in 1255. Ann, daughter of Gerorge and Ann Darwood, named in March 1727 in London. The name may also found as Durward, Dorwood, Durrad, and Durrett.

Variations:

More common variations are: Durard, Dorward, Darward, Duarard, Draward, Derward, Durardo, Dreward, Daurad, Drard.

Scotland:

The surname Durward first appeared in the Valley of the River Dee, where they held a family seat in their regions. The Pictish impact on Scottish history declined after Kenneth Macalpine became King of all Scotland.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Reiner Dureward , dated about 1208, in the “Curia Rolls of Norfolk.” It was during the time of King John, dated 1199 – 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Durward who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included ChristinaJ. Durward, who moved to the United States from Aberdeen, Scotland, in 1907. Elizabeth Durward, who settled in America from Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1907. Grace Durward, who landed in America from Monifieth, Scotland, in 1907. James Durward, who shifted to the United States from Edinburgh, Scotland, in 1907. Jane Durward, who landed in America from Glasgow, Scotland, in 1907.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Durward: Canada 252; United States 235; England 215; Australia 169; Scotland 164; South Africa 146; New Zealand 12; Cambodia 2; Czech Republic 2; Turkey 2.

Notable People:

Durward Knowles (born 1917), was an Olympic champion pilot from the Bahamas.

Durward Lely (1852-1944), was a Scottish opera musician.

Durward Family Gift Ideas

Browse Durward family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More durward Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bocking, co. Essex). Erm. a chev. betw. three crescents or.
2) Same Arms. Crest—A demi man ppr. vested gu. holding up a gem ring.
3) (co. Essex, and Cloughton, co. York). Erm. on a chev. sa. (another, az.) three crescents or.
4) (co. Norfolk). Ar. on a chev. sa. three crescents or.
5) (Scotland). Ar. a cross gu.
6) Erm. on a chev. sa. three annulets or. Crest—A dexter hand holding a scimetar indented on the back and cutting at a pen all ppr.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
14. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:ring
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P94