Eastwood Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Eastwood Family Coat of Arms

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Eastwood Coat of Arms Meaning

Eastwood Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Estwood.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Eastwood. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.
eastwood coat of arms

Eastwood Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Eastwood blazon are the stag, oak tree, boar and swan. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and sable.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits! 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. Although sometimes described simply as a tree most often the specific species was named, and the oak tree or oak leaf is a typical example that frequently is depicted in arms, sometimes fructed with acorns of a different colour. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Oak For good reason, Wade assigns the meaning of “antiquity and strength” to this symbol. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P126

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Eastwood Name

Eastwood Origin:

England

Origins of Eastwood:

The Eastwood surname originally evolved from an Anglo-Saxon origin and is locational from the various places so termed as, for example in Essex and Nottinghamshire. However, most of these names of various places had evolved originally from the ancient Old English pre 7th Century “East”, an easterly direction, with “wudu”, a wood or forest, as in the case of Eastwood in Essex, first registered in the book of Domesday of the year 1086 as “Estuuda”. However, the place in Nottinghamshire first registered in the Domesday document as “Estewic”, and in the Pipe Rolls of 1166 as “Est Twait”, which evolves from “East”, as before, and “thwaite”, a piece of cleared land. Locational surnames, like this, were usually obtained by a regional landowner, or by the King of the estates, and specifically by those ancient settlers of a place who had shifted to another land, mostly in seeking of work, and thereafter best recognized by the name of their birth origin. According to Early Recordings from Essex, Chapel Records included the naming of John Eastwood on June 1558, at Great Bentley, and the naming of William Eastwood in November 1590, at Cold Norton. A Coat of weapons gifted to a family of the name Eastwood is a black shield, an ermine chevron with two gold couple nearby, in the mid of three silver swans curved, the Crest is on a ducal band per pale gold.

Variations:

More common variations are: Eastwoode, Eastawood, Eastewood, Astwood, Estwood, Eastwod, Eastood, Eastwwod, Eastwodd, Astoto.

England:

The origins of the surname Eastwood were in Cheshire where people there held a family seat from early times.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Adam de Estwde, dated 1221, recorded at Ely Cathedral, Cambridgeshire. It was during the time of King Henry III who was known to be the “The Frenchman,” dated 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the Eastwood had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Eastwood settled in the United States in our different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Eastwood who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Edward Eastwood arrived in Virginia in the year 1621. Richard Eastwood who brought land and Richard Eastwood arrived in Virginia in the same year in 1642. John and Henry Eastwood arrived in Maryland respectively in the years 1667 and 1668.

The following century saw much more Eastwood surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Eastwood who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Eastwood and Mary Eastwood who arrived in Virginia respectively in the years 1701 and 1717. Sarah Edward and Sarah Edward at the age of 16 landed in South Carolina in the same year 1774.

The following century saw much more Eastwood surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Eastwood who settled in the United States in the 20th century included Abraham, Dienal, David, Thomas, Walter and William Eastwood all arrived in Pennsylvania in the mid of 1800. Joseph Eastwood came in New York in 1841.

Australia:

People with the name Eastwood who settled in Australia in the 19th century included John Eastwood and Joseph Eastwood an English prisoner from Lancaster aboard the same ship “ Ann” in August 1809 and settled in New South Wales, Australia. John and Simeon Eastwood arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the same ship “ Lady Lilford in the same year 1839, Henry Eastwood who was a baker at the age of 21 came to South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “ Punjab”.

New-Zealand:

People with the name Eastwood who settled in New-Zealand in the 19th century included James, Charles, William, Ann M. Eastwood and Alfred H. Eastwood arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “ Gertrude” in the year 1863.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Eastwood: United States 6,284; England 8,061; Australia 2,011; Canada 1,073; South Africa 1,242; Wales 316; Scotland 368; Northern Ireland 608; New-Zealand 568; Ghana 799.

Notable People:

Arthur Eastwood was a New Zealand rower.

Clint Eastwood is an American film producer, artist, director, writer, singer, and songwriter.

Freddy Eastwood is a Coventry City football player.

Greg Eastwood is a New Zealand rugby league football player.

Jim Eastwood is a Northern Irish businessperson.

Mike Eastwood is a famous player in NHL ice hockey.

Paul Eastwood is a British rugby league football player.

Eastwood Family Gift Ideas

Browse Eastwood family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Castletown Castle, co. Louth, originally from co. Nottingham; granted by Carney, Ulster, 1658, to John Eastwood, who was Sheriff and Lord Mayor of Dublin, temp. Charles II.). Motto—Oriens sylva. Or, three stags trippant sa. that in base standing under a tree ppr. Crest—A wild boar az. with a branch of acorns in its mouth ppr. The family, however, now use for crest, a stag couped at the loins ppr.
2) (Flockton Nettus, co. York; granted 1747). Sa. a chev. erm. with two couple closes or, betw. three swans ar. beaked and membered of the third, the two in chief respecting each other.
3) Same Arms. Crest—On a ducal coronet per pale or and gu. a lion pass. guard. per pale of the second and first crowned ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Oak
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P126
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67