Edwards Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Edwards Family Coat of Arms

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Edwards Coat of Arms Meaning

Edwards Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Edwardes.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Edwards. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Edwards Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Edwards blazon are the lion rampant and garb. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, ermines and or .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Ermine and its variants is a very ancient pattern. It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. Ermines is a variant in which the field is sable (black) and the ermine tails argent (white), the inverse of the normal pattern.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Edwards Name

Edwards Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Edwards derives from the personal given name Edward. The personal given name of Edward comes from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “Eadward,” which itself comes from the elements “ead” which can be translated to mean prosperity or fortune, and the element “ward” or “weard” which can be translated to mean guard. Thus, the personal given name of Edward can be translated to mean “prosperity guard,” or “guard of fortune.” The surname of Edwards is the patronymic form of the personal given name, adding an “s” to denote that the original bearer of this surname was the son of Edward. This means that the surname of Edwards means “son of the prosperity guard,” or “son of the guard of the fortune.” The popularity of this surname can be traced to the canonized Kings of England, one Edward the Martyr who ruled from the year 962 to the year 979, and one Edward the Confessor, who ruled from the year 1004 to the year 1066. This personal given name was originally found in the Doomsday Book of 1086 under the personal given name of Eaduuardus and Eduuard.

Variations:

More common variations are: Edwardes, Edward, Eadwards, Edewards, Edwardson, Edwardsa, Eddwards, Edwaards, Edwarrds, Edawards, Edwareds

History:

Wales:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Edwards was found in the country of Wales. One person who was named John Edwards was mentioned and named in the Records of Chirk in the year 1498. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of King Henry VII, who was commonly known throughout the ages as “The Last Welsh King.” King Henry VII ruled from the year 1485 to the year 1509. Wales was the country where the patronymic form of this surname of Edwards was found with the added “s” at the end, denoting “son of Edward.” Other mentions of this surname in the country of Wales include Humphrey Edwards, who died in the year 1658, who also signed the death warrant of King Charles I in the year 1649, and who served as the commissioner of South Wales in the year 1651. Another mention of the surname of Edwards in Wales was in the year 1767 to the year 1768, when John Edwards translated the text Pilgrim’s Progress into Welsh. The largest concentration of those who carry the surname of Edwards live in the county of Glamorgan.

Scotland:

Those who carry the surname of Edwards can be found throughout Scotland’s eastern region.

England:

The surname of Edwards can be found throughout the country of England. The areas with the largest concentration of those who bear the surname of Edwards can be seen in the areas of Lancashire county and in and around the city of London.

United States of America:

The United States of America was an area where many European citizens migrated to in the 1600’s. Those who are known to have the surname of Edwards were among those who migrated to America. The first person to bear the surname of Edwards in America was one Arthur Edwards, who settled in the state of Virginia in the year 1622. In 1633, Robert Edwards was recorded to have landed in the state of Maryland. Those who carry the surname of Edwards can be found in Georgia, Texas, North Carolina, Alabama, Virginia, California, Missouri, Pennsylvania, New York, and in Illinois.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Edwards: United States 355,344; England 91,923; Australia 40,643; Canada 24,731; South Africa 24,419; Nigeria 18,493; Jamaica 16,669; Wales 16,379; New Zealand 6,194; Trinidad and Tobago 5,600,

Notable People:

Ronnie Claire Ed wards (1933-2016) who was an American actress who was most notably recognized on the TV series The Waltons portraying Corabeth Walton Godsey

William Donlon “Don” Edwars (1915-2015) who was a politician from America, who served as a Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from California from the year 1993 to the year 1995, from the year 1975 to the year 1993, and from the year 1963 to the year 1975

Mr. Isaac Edwards (died in 1915) who was a Third Class passenger from America who was aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and perished in the sinking of the vessel in the year 1915

Geoffrey Bruce Owen “Geoff” Edwards (1931-2014) who was a TV actor from America, hosted the game shows Starcade and Treasure Hunt, he was most notably recognized for his role on Petticoat Junction

Lieutenant-General Idwal Hubert Edwards (1895-1981) who was the Deputy Chief of Staff for Operations, at Headquarters of the U.S. Air Force, Washington D.C. from the year 1950 to the year 1951

Major-General Heber L. Edwards (1897-1962) who was an Adjunct-General of North Dakota from the year 1937 to the year 1962

Edwards Family Gift Ideas

Browse Edwards family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Ness Strange, co. Salop; derived, through Thomas ap Llewelyn, from Einion Efell, Lord of Cynllaeth, in co. Denbigh, living 1182, son of Madoc, last prince of Powys-Fadoc). (Dolseran, co. Merioneth). Per fesse sa. and ar. a lion ramp. counterchanged. Crest—Within a wreath of the colours a lion ramp. as in the arms.
2) (Garth, co. Montgomery, bart.; Mary Cornelia, only child of Sir John Edwards, Bart., M.P., m. 1846, George Henry Robert Charles, Marquess of Londonderry). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, quarterly, gu. and or, a fess betw. four lions pass. guard. all counterchanged; 2nd and 3rd, sa. on a fess betw. a lion ramp, in chief ar. and a fleur-de-lis in base or, three snakes interlaced ppr. Crest—A lion pass. guard. per pale or and gu. resting the dexter paw on an escutcheon of the last charged with a nag’s head erased ar.
3) (Pyenest, co. York, bart.). Motto—Omne bonum Dei donum. Az. on a bend nebuly ar. cottised or, a fleur-de-lis betw. two martlets of the field. Crest—Out of a crown vallery or, a talbot's head ar. seme-de-lis az.
4) (co. Bedford). Ar. a chev. ermines betw. three nags’ heads erased sa.
5) (City of Bristol). Erm. a chev. per pale or and sa. Crest—An eagle displ az.
6) (Lelant, co. Cornwall; Thomas Edwards. Visit. 1620). Ermines an antelope ramp. or. Crest—An antelope ramp. sa. bezantee attired or.
7) (Trematon, Saltash, co. Cornwall). Motto—Perseverando. Per. chev. az. and or, in chief a cross crosslet betw. two garbs, and in base a garb betw. two cross crosslets all counterchanged.
8) (Farncott, co. Salop, formerly of Lea Castle, co. Salop, and of Chirk, co. Denbigh; descended from Tudor Trevor, a chieftain of the Marches of Wales). Per bend sinister erm. and ermines, over all a lion ramp. or. Crest—A man's head sidefaced in a helmet all ppr.
9) (Chirk, co. Denbigh, and Welham, co. Leicester). Same Arms. Crest—A lion's head erased per bend sinister erm. and ermines.
10) (Arlesey Bury, co. Bedford; William Bedford, Captain E. I. Company, son of Rev. William Foller Bedford, by Margaret, his wife, dau. of Richard Edwards, Esq., of Arlesey, assumed the name and arms of Edwards, by royal licence, 20 Nov. 1792, having succeeded to the estates of his maternal uncle, Richard Edwards, who d. 1789). Same Arms. Crests—1st: the Prince of Wales’ feathers surmounted by a heron plume; 2nd: An esquire’s helmet ppr.
11) (Northowran, co. York). Same Arms. Crest—A lion's head erased per bend sinister erm and ermines.
12) (Liddorne and Lea, co. Salop). Motto—A vyno Duw dervid. Same Arms. Crest—A man’s head sidefaced in a helmet all ppr.
13) (Exeter, co. Devon, and Taunton, co. Somerset; descended from Edwards, of Ludlow, co. Salop. Visit. Devon, 1620). Same Arms. Crest—An ibex pass. sa. bezantee attired and maned or.
14) (Brislington, co. Somerset). Same Arms. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or, holding betw. the paws a castle ar.
15) (Prestbury, co. Gloucester). Same Arms, a bordure engr. of the last. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or, holding betw. the paws a castle ar.
16) (Henslow, co. Bedford). Per bend sinister sa. and erm. a lion ramp. or. Crest—A helmet ppr. garnished or, thereon, on a wreath, a plume of feathers ar.
17) (Exeter). Same Arms. Crest—An ibex pass. sa. bezantee, maned, armed, and attired with two straight horns or.
18) (co. Somerset, Middle Temple, London, and Bristol). Same Arms, a border engr. or.
19) (Isle of Ely, and Portlade, co. Sussex. Arms from a monument in Wisbeach Church, to Thomas Edwards, High Bailiff of the Isle of Ely, temp. Queen Anne). Ar. a fess ermines betw. three martlets sa. Crest—On a ducal coronet ar. a tiger pass. or.
20) (Essex and Loudon). Ar. a fesse betw. six martlets sa.
21) (co. Flint). Gu. a chev. engr. betw. three boars' heads erased at the neck ar. Crest—A boar’s head erased, as in the arms.
22) (Shrewsbury, co. Salop). Same Arms. Crest—A man’s head in a helmet in profile all ppr.
23) (co. Salop). Same Arms, field az.
24) (co. Hereford; said to be derived from Edwards, Baron of Anglesey). Ar. a cross flory engr. betw. four Cornish choughs sa. armed gu. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a demi lion ramp. gu. holding in the dexter paw a sword ppr.
25) (cos. Salop and Huntingdon). Erm. a lion ramp gu. Crest—An ibex pass. sa. armed, tufted, maned, and double horned or.
26) (originally of Maes-yr-hen-llys, co. Denbigh, subsequently of Gouldgrieve, co. Flint, descended from Roderick the Great, King of Wales). Motto—Heb Dduw heb ddim, Duw a digon; which signifies, Everything with God, nothing without God. Gu. a chev. betw. three roses ar. the coat of Rhodri Mawr; and also the peculiar arms attached to the name, viz., sa. a stag tripping or, attired and unguled ar. on a chief of the same three falcons ppr., quartering Kynaston, of Hordley (which see). Crest—A lion's head erased ermines betw. two palm branches ppr.
27) (Old Court, co. Wicklow; confirmed by Carney, Ulster, 1683, to Richard Edwards, Esq., of co. Wicklow). Motto—Heb Dduw heb ddim, Duw a digon. Vert a stag pass, or, attired and unguled ar. (derived from the coat of Hedd Molwynog, seventh in descent from Rhodri Mawr), with, as an augmentation in 1680, on a chief ar. three falcons ppr., quartering Kynaston, Grey, Cherleton, Holland, and Plantagenet. Crest—A lion’s head erased erm. betw. two palm branches issuing.
28) (late of the Manor House, Bishop’s Lavington, co. Wilts; seated at Tilshead Manor, 20 Henry VIII., as appears from a MS. copy of a court roll of Sir Thomas Seymour under Elizabeth Ryperose, abbess of Wilton, the surname being then George, since then the name of Edwards has been adopted through an intermarriage). Or, on a chev. engr. betw. three heraldic tigers’ heads erased sa. as many falcons rising ppr.
29) (cos. Salop and Kent). Erm. a lion ramp. guard. gu. armed az. on a canton or, an eagle displ. with two necks sa. Crest—A unicorn sa. with two horns or.
30) (Tyrington, co. Norfolk, and London). Erm. a lion ramp. guard. az. on a canton gu. an eagle displ. with two necks or.
31) (Lord Mayor of London, 1679). Erm. a lion ramp. az. on a canton or, an eagle displ. sa.
32) (Reedham Hall, co. Norfolk, co. York, and London; James Edwards, son of Sir James Edwards, Knt., Lord Mayor of London, 1679, and grandson of William Edwards, of Welsh descent, who settled in co. York, was created a bart. 1691, extinct 1764). Erm. a lion ramp, guard, az. a canton or.
33) (London). Ar. a chev. gu. in chief two bucks' heads cabossed ppr. and in base on a mount an oak tree all ppr.
34) (London). Ar. a fesse ermines cotised sa. betw. three martlets of the last. Crest—On a ducal coronet or, a tiger pass sa. maned of the first.
35) (London). Az. a bend vaire gu. and ar. cotised of the third, betw. two eagles displ. or. Crest—An eagle's head erased ppr. ducally gorged or.
36) (London). Az. on a bend betw. two cotises ar. three martlets gu. Crest—A talbot's head issuing out of a marquess's coronet.
37) (Visit. London, 1568). Ar. a fess ermines betw. three martlets sa. Crest—A lion’s gamb couped and erect erm. grasping a goat's leg erased sa. armed or.
38) (Haverfordwest, co. Pembroke). Erm. a lion ramp. sa. Crest—On a mount vert a wivern ar.
39) (Llandaff House, co. Glamorgan). Per pale erm. and ermines a lion ramp. or, between two flaunches ar. each charged with a spear paleways sa., quartering sa. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis ar., for Richards. Crest—An oak tree, on the dexter side a gate ppr., on the sinister a lion ramp. against the tree gu.
40) (Ashill, co. Norfolk). (Hardingham Hall, co. Norfolk). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a fesse betw. three martlets sa. a cinquefoil or, for Edwards; 2nd, quarterly, gu. and ar. in the 1st and 4th quarters a cross potent or, for Cross; 3rd, per. chev. ar. and gu. a crescent counterchanged, for Chapman. Crest—A martlet sa. charged on the wing with a cinquefoil or. Motto—Quid leges sine moribus.
41) (Pentre, co. Montgomery, and Cilcen, co. Flint). Ar. a falcon, wings elevated ppr. belled, beaked, and legged or, holding in its dexter talon a martlet of the last, all within a bordure engr. or.
42) (cos. Lancaster and Denbigh; confirmed by Sir George Naylor in 1825 to Joshua Edwards, of Manchester). Motto—Duw ydi ein cryfdwr. Or, a pile az. and a chev. counterchanged betw. three horses’ heads erased of the second. Crest—On a mount vert a horse’s head erased or, charged on the neck with a chev. gu. betw. two branches of oak ppr.
43) (Toxteth Park, Liverpool, and Broughton, co. Lancaster). Motto—Over the crest: A vynno Duw dervid (what God wills will be accomplished); under the arms: Duw ydi ein cryfdwr (God is our strength). Same Arms. Crest—A man in complete armour resting the dexter hand on a sword, point downwards ppr., and supporting with the sinister hand a shield of the arms.
44) (Rhyl, North Wales). Ar. a cross flory engr. betw. four Cornish choughs sa. armed gu.
45) (Wales). Quarterly, or and gu. in each quarter a lion pass. guard. counterchanged. Crest—A lion pass. guard. or.
46) (Trematon Hall, near Saltash). Motto—Perseverando. Per chev. az. and or, in chief a cross crosslet betw. two garbs, and in base a garb betw. two crosses crosslet. all counterchanged. Crest—In front of two wheat stalks ppr. a griffin’s head erased per chev. or and az.
47) Ar. two chevronels sa. betw. three eagles’ heads erased gu. Crest—On a ducal coronet or, a tiger pass. sa. maned and tufted gold.
48) (Rhyd-y-Gors, co. Carmarthen). Motto—Aspera ad virtutem est via. Quarterly, 1st, sa. a lion ramp. within an orle of cinquefoils or; 2nd, gu. a chev. or, betw. three bowers’ knots sa.; 3rd, sa. three bucks’ heads cabossed ar.; 4th, chequy or and sa. a fesse ar. Crest—A demi lion or, holding betw. the paws a bower's knot sa.
49) (Thomas Edwards, Esq., of Dublin; from the Fun. Ent. of Sir Edward Fisher, Knt., of Prospect, co. Wexford, d. Dec. 1631, whose wife was Alice, dau. of said Thomas Edwards). Ar. a chev. engr. az. fretty of the first betw. three Cornish choughs sa. beaked and legged gu.
50) (Baron Kensington). Motto—Garde la foi. Quarterly, lstand 4th, erm. a lion ramp. sa., for Edwardes; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a chev. betw. three crosses botony or. Crest—Upon a mount Vert a wyvern, wings expanded ar. Supporters—Two reindeer ppr. attired and unguled or.
51) (Shrewsbury, bart.). Motto—A vyno Duw dervid. Gu. a chev. engr. betw. three tigers’ heads erased at the neck ar. Crest—A man's head and shoulders affrontee in armour, the helmet open vizored ppr. garnished or.
52) (Rhyd-y-Gors, co. Carmarthen). Motto—Aspera ad virtutem est via. Quarterly, 1st, sa. a lion ramp. within an orle of cinquefoils or; 2nd, gu. a chev. or, betw. three bowers’ knots; 3rd, sa. three bucks’ heads caboshed ar.; 4th, chequy or and sa. a fesse ar. Crest—A demi lion or, holding betw. the paws a bower’s knot.
53) (Gileston Manor, co. Glamorgan). Mottoes—Vigilate, and Gardez la foi. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a chev. embattled and counter-embattled or, betw. three sea horses naiant ar.; 2nd and 3rd, erm. a lion ramp. sa. Crest—A bear’s paw, holding a battle axe ar.
54) (Visit. London, 1568). Ar. a fess ermines betw. three martlets sa. Crest—A lion’s gamb couped and erect erm. grasping a goat's leg erased sa. armed or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe