Elliott Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Elliott Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Elliott Coat of Arms Meaning

Elliott Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Elliott. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

elliott coat of arms

Elliott Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Elliott blazon are the castle, pellet, elephant and trefoil. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and azure .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Architectural items, from individual components to entire buildings 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92 feature frequently as charges In a coat of arms. Not surprisingly, considering the times from which many arms date, fortifications are common. The castle is perhaps second only to the tower in this usage, and often described in some detail as to its construction, the disposition of windows and so on. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle Continental examples also sometimes include attackers on scaling ladders. Wade tells us that the appearance of a castle indicates “granduer and solidity” and one can understand why. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and pellet is a roundle sable, or black. It is also known as an ogress or gunstone. Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

The Elephant is not common on shields, although it occurs sometimes as a supporter of the shield and its trunk or proboscide is very frequently to be found in crests. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Elephant In meaning, it tends to adopt its more common usage and is said to represent someone who is both “sagacious and courageous”. 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P64

Elliott Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Elliott Name

Elliot Origin:

Ireland, Scotland

Origins of Name:

The surname of Elliot can be found within the Old English culture. The ultimate derivations of the surname of Elliot stem from the Old English words of “Aelelyoo” and “Aeoelgeat.” Both of these words can mean “noble combat” or “noble great,” and are comprised of the elements “aoel” which can be translated to mean “noble” and “gyo” which can be translated to mean “battle” or the second element of “gait” which can be translated to mean “goat.” Another possible origin of the surname of Elliot is that it was derived from the Old Gaelic personal given names of “Elleach,” “Elloch,” and “Eloth.” All of these personal given names can be translated to refer to “a mound on the bank of a river,” meaning that this is a topographical translation of the surname. A topographical surname was given to someone who lived on or near a prominent structure within the area from which the person hailed. This means that everyone within this area could distinguish the man-made or natural structure that was being used to describe a person.

Variations:

More common variations are: Elliotte, Elleiott, Eilliot; Yelliott, Eilliott, Eilioitt, Eelliott, Elliotta, Elliotty, Elliot, Eliott, Eliot

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Elliot can be found in the country of England. One person by the name of Boydin Ailot was mentioned in the Hundred Rolls of the County of Cambridgeshire in the year of 1279. This document was ordered, written, and decreed under the reign of one King Edward I of England, who was commonly known throughout the ages as one “Edward Longshanks,” and “The Hammer of the Scots.” He was such named for the constant battles, wars, and conquests that he was pushing onto the Scottish people of the time. King Edward I of England ruled from the year 1272 to the year 1307. Other mentions of the surname of Elliot in the country of England include Alice Aylett, who was mentioned as being baptized at St. Peter’s, Paul’s Wharf, which is located in London, in the year of 1648, while one Walter Ellit was named as leaving the country aboard as ship to the West Indies, in the year 1635. Those who bear the surname of Elliot in the country of England can be found in high concentrations in the areas of Northumberland, Yorkshire, Lancashire, and Durham counties.

Scotland:

The country of Scotland has a sizeable population of people who bear the surname of Elliot. The areas that are said to have the largest population of people who are known by the surname of Elliot can be found within the counties in the southern part of the country, especially the specific county of Lanarkshire.

United States of America:

Within the United States, there are many people who carry the surname of Elliot. This surname was brought to the United States during the European Migration, which was a movement of people from Europe to the United States in the 17th Century. The areas with the largest population of people who bear the surname of Elliot can be found in the states of Missouri, Illinois, Michigan, Kentucky, Indiana, New York, and within the state of Pennsylvania.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Elliot: United States 152,366; England 39,751; Canada 20,749; Australia 18,466; South Africa 11,397; Nigeria 3,668; New Zealand 3,008; Jamaica 2,945; Scotland 2,861; Northern Ireland 2,516

Notable People:

Elisabeth Elliot (1926-2016) who was a Christian author and speaker from the United States of America

Lawrence Lee Elliot (born in 1938) who is a former outfielder who played in Major League Baseball (MLB) and was from the United States of

Peter Elliot (born in 1966) who is a writer, media personality, and editor from America

Alonzo Elliot (1891-1964) who was a composer and songwriter from the United States of America

Andrew Elliot (1728-1797) who was an Acting Colonial Governor of the Province of New York in the year of 1783 and was from the United States of America

James Ludlow Elliot (1943-2011) who was an astronomer and scientist from the United States of America

Biff Elliot (born in 1923) who was an actor from the United States of America

John Elliot (1914-1972) who was a songwriter from the United States of America

Win Elliot (1915-1998) who was a TV and radio sportscaster from the United States of America, also served as a game show host

Daniel Giraud Elliot (1835-1915) who was a zoologist from the United States of America

Elliott Family Gift Ideas

Browse Elliott family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More elliott Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Reg. Ulster’s Office, as the arms of Sir Thomas Elliott, co. Wilts). Ar. a fesse betw. four cotises wavy az. in chief three pellets, quartering ar. a chev. gu. betw. three castles triple-towered sa.
2) (John Elliott, Mayor and Alderman of Dublin. Visit. City of Dublin, 1607). Ar. two bars wavy per pale az. and gu. Crest—An elephant’s head couped sa. eared and tusked ar.
3) (Ireland; Sir John Elliott, third Baron of the Exchequer, knighted at Dublin Castle, 14 Feb. 1608). Ar. a fess gu. betw. four bars wavy az. in chief three pellets. Crest—An elephant’s head couped ar. charged with three pellets in pale, tusked or.
4) (confirmed to Thomas Elliott, Esq., of Johnstown House, co. Carlow, son of Thomas Elliott, of Rathcrogue, co. Carlow). Motto—Occurrent nubes. Gu. on a bend engr. betw. two trefoils slipped or, a baton az. Crest—A griffin sejant gu. holding in the beak a snake ppr. and charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped or.
5) (granted to John Elliott, of the city of Dublin, merchant). Motto—Perseverando. Gu. on a bend or, a baton az. within a bordure engr. ar. charged with eight escallops of the third. Crest—A cubit arm naked and erect, holding a Highland broadsword ppr. hilt and pommel or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 92
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Castle
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Elephant
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P64