Elwood Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Elwood Family Coat of Arms

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Elwood Coat of Arms Meaning

Elwood Name Origin & History

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Elwood Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Elwood blazon are the demi lion, shamrock, mullet and buck’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, gules and azure .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The demi-lion is a variant of the typical creature shown only from the waist upward. It can take all same poses and attitudes of its fully represented brethren and often appears to be emerging from some other device such as a fess or chief. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion No special significance should be given to the demi appearance and it should be taken to have the same meanings and interpretations as the noble king of beasts itself.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. Whilst the fleur-de-lys, the French “Flower of the Lily” may have become stylised almost beyond recognition 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P141, it still sometimes appears in a more pictorial form as the “lily of the garden”. The shamrock is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is of course indelibly associated with the country of Ireland.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Elwood Name

Elwood Origin:

England

Origins of Elwood:

The origin of this unique and interesting surname originally evolved from Anglo-Saxon, it is a locational name, or from an Olde English pre 7th Century specific name. As a locational surname, Ellwood and its different forms Elwood and Allwood evolved from the place named Ellwood in Gloucestershire. The name of the place means “the older forest,” which evolved or originated from the Olde English “ellern,” which means older tree, with “wudu,” which means wood. Locational surnames were commonly obtained by a common landholder, or by the King of the palace, and particularly by those old citizens of an area who had to migrate to another place, mostly in seek of work, and then they are best recognized by the name of their home town. Ellwood may also evolve from the Olde English particular name “Aelfweald”, which is the combination of the components “aelf”, elf, and “weald”, rule, and is registered in the Domesday Book of the year 1086 in its Latinized formation as “Aluuoldus” and “Alfuuold”. The wedding of John Allwood and Elizabeth Littlefield is registered at St. James’s Chapel, Duke’s Place, London, on March 1680.

Variations:

More common variations are: Ellwood, Elwwood, Elewood, Elwod, Eellwood, Ellwoode, Eleywood, Alwood, Elwwod, Ewlood.

England:

The origins of the surname Elwood is found in Gloucestershire where people held a family seat from early times.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Robert Elwald, dated about 1469, in the “Register of the Freemen of the City of York”. It was during the time of King Edward IV, who was known to be the “The Self Proclaimed King,“ dated 1461 – 1483. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Elwood had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Elwood settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Elwood who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Henry Elwood arrived in Virginia in the year 1624. Henery Elwood and John Elwood arrived in Virginia respectively in the years 1624 and 1645. Thomas Elwood landed in Pennsylvania in the year 1682.

Some of the people with the surname Elwood settled in the United States in the 19th century included John Elwood would eventually settle in New York in 1834. L Elwood arrived in San Francisco, California in the year 1851.

Some of the people with the surname Elwood settled in the United States in the 20th century included Bridget Elwood at the age of 34, landed in America from Galway in 1903. Charles Elwood at the age of 11 arrived in America from Stokestown in 1903. Annie Elwood from KilKelly at the age of 23 arrived in America in the year 1910. Calhoun J. Elwood emigrated to America in 1911 and Deda Elwood at the age of 50 landed in America in 1913.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Elwood who settled in Canada in the 20th century included Arthur Elwood at the age of 29 emigrated to Toronto, Canada in 1914.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Elwood who settled in Australia in the 19th century included B. Elwood arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Spartan” in 1849. Alicia Elwood and Mary A. Elwood who were the home servant arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the same ships “Fortune” in the same year, 1854.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Elwood: United States 6,297; England 780; Australia 132; Canada 380; Wales 56; New Zealand 95; Ireland 115; Hungary 131; Northern Ireland 262; Scotland 66.

Notable People:

Augustus R. Elwood (1819-1881), was a New York lawmaker and politician.

Brian Elwood (born 1933), was a New Zealand public servant.

Edwin L. Elwood (1847-1907), was an American knight.

Eric Elwood (born 1969), was an Irish player in a rugby union.

Graham Elwood (born 1969), was an American entertainer, artist, and author.

James Elwood (born 1922), was a British doctor.

Jimmy Elwood (1901-1936), was an Irish football player.

Paul Elwood (born 1958), was an American songwriter and banjo player.

Roger Elwood (1943-2007), was an American science fiction author.

Elwood Family Gift Ideas

Browse Elwood family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. York). Erm. on a chief gu. a lion ramp. issuant or.
2) (Clayton Priory, co. Sussex). Motto—Fide et sedulitate. Az. a, chev. ar. in chief two mullets or, in base a buck’s head cabossed of the second, attired of the third. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour, the hand brandishing a battle axe all ppr.
3) (granted to the descendants of William Elwood, Esq., of Loghmaske, co. Mayo). Erm. on a chev. gu. betw. three shamrocks slipped vert as many bezants, on a chief of the second a demi lion or. Crest—A lion ramp. gu. resting the forepaws on the trunk of an oak tree ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P141
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105