Elworth Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Elworth Family Coat of Arms

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Elworth Coat of Arms Meaning

Elworth Name Origin & History

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Elworth Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Elworth blazon are the fesse embattled and chamber piece. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and or.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. This created an opportunity to add decorative edging to the band, of many forms, and to very pleasing artisitic effect, at least close up – it must be admitted that at distance some of the forms are hard to distinguish! An edge which is decorated like the top of a castle wall is said to be embattled, or sometimes crenelle, from the original French. (In castle building terminology the parts of the wall that stick up are known as merlons, and the resulting gaps as crenels). A whole sub-section of heraldic terminology has sprung up to describe whether these crennellations appear on which edges, whether they line up or alternate, have additional steps or rounded tops. The interested reader is directed to the reference for the full set! 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Embattled For obvious reasons, use of this decoration is to be associated with castles and fortified towns, an early authority, Guillim suggest also some association with fire, but with out clear reason 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P41. In all, this is one of the more common, and most effective and appropriate of the decorative edges.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The cannon is depicted as we might expect, if mounted the carraige may be a different colour. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Guns We need look no further than the military connection for any meaning in this device.Chamber piece is simply an alternative name for the barrel of a cannon

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Elworth Name

Origins of Elworth:
The old roots of the Elworth family name are in the Anglo-Saxon culture.  The name Elworth acquires from when the family resided in Cambridgeshire, where they acquired their name from the place-name Elsworth.  The place-name derived from the Old English particular name Eli and worth, an Old English word for farm.  The place-name converted literally as 1311’s farm.  One relatively recent discovery that did much to regulate English spelling was the printing press.  However, before its design, even the most educated people noted their names according to sound rather than spelling.  The spelling variations of which the name Elworth has appeared include Ellesworth, Elsworth, Ellsworth, Elisworth, Ellisworth, Elsworthy and much more.

England:
The surname Elworth first appeared in Cambridgeshire at Elsworth, a church, in the union of Caxton and Arrington, hundred of Papworth. An old Saxon hamlet, it dates back to 974 when it first noted as Eleswurth.  By the Domesday Book of 1086, the place name had developed to Elesuuorde.  Elworth is a hamlet and an area of Sandbach, Cheshire but is rather recent in history so as to be an unsimilar origin of the surname.  Elworthy is a small hamlet and local church in the Brendon Hills area of Somerset.

United States:
An examination of early immigration records and tourist ship lists showed that people bearing the name Elworth arrived in North America very early as Josiah Ellsworth who settled in New England in 1620 and bought land there.  The Ellsworths were among the first travelers to land in the New World.  Later David Ellsworth landed in Massachusetts and shifted to Boston in 1767.  By 1852, John Ellsworth had traveled across the states to settle in San Francisco.

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Browse Elworth family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Or, a fesse embattled sa. masoned of the first betw. three chamber-pieces of the second. Crest—On a mount an ermine pass. ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Embattled
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P41
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Guns