Enfield Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Enfield Family Coat of Arms

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Enfield Coat of Arms Meaning

Enfield Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Emenfield.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Enfield. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Enfield Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Enfield blazon are the inescutcheon, martlet, canton and mullet. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and gules.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The escutcheon simply represents smaller shield shapes included within the shield, and its close relative, the inescutcheon is just a larger version occupying most of the field. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon There is no particular significance that can accorded to the escutcheon itself, but attention should be paid to the colour and devices that are borne upon it. The escutcheon may also be added to an existing coat of arms either as recognition of some additional honour (an escutcheon of augmentation”) or in the case where arms that are already quartered are to be combined an escutcheon with the new arms may be placed overall (an ”escutcheon of pretence”). 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

“The canton stands very high among honourable bearings”, according to Wade, a noted symbologist 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48. The canton is a square shape, normally occupying the dexter chief of the shield. An early example is SUTTON, Bishop of Lincoln in the 13th century, who bore “argent a canton sable”. It occupies less space than a quarter and hence is sometimes added to an existing shield to difference branches of the same family, or, when a charge is added to it, to indicate some honour has been recieved 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton. Wade remarks, that, in common with all square features can be associated with the virtue of“constancy”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Enfield Name

Origins of Enfield:
When the ancestors of the Enfield family moved to England following the Norman Invasion in 1066, they brought their family name with them.  They resided in the division of Berkshire, England.

Variations:
More common variations are: Einfield, Enefield, Enffield, Enfild, Enfeld, Anfield, Infield, Einfeld, Enfeldt, Enfiled.

England:
The surname Enfield first appeared in Berkshire where they were Lords of the Estate of Englefield. “This church, which contains 1379a. 3r. 16p., acquires its name from the Saxon word Ingle, a fire or beacon light and perhaps had its origin about the middle of the ninth century, when the Danes, having made themselves masters of Reading, sent out a patrol from their army to attack the Saxons, who settled here, and who drove them back with great loss.”  Gilbert and Stephen held their land here from the Norman Chief resident, Williams FitzAnsculf c. 1086.  Enfield in a church in the union and hundred of Edmonton, Middlesex.  “This place is in Domesday Book called Enefelde, showing its situation among fields, or in the downed part of a forest.”

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Enfield landed in the United States in 18th.    Some of the people with the name Enfield who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included George Enfield who arrived in New Jersey in the year 1772.

Enfield Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Essex). Gu. an inescutcheon or, an orle of eight martlets ar. Crest—A hand holding an escutcheon or, charged with a martlet ppr.
2) (co. Middlesex). Ar. on a canton gu. a mullet or, (another, ar.).
3) Barry of six gu. and ar. on a chief or, a lion pass. az. over all a bend sa.
4) Ar. on a canton sa. a mullet or, pierced gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P48
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Canton