Emmett Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Emmett Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Emmett Coat of Arms Meaning

Emmett Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Emmett. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

emmett coat of arms

Emmett Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Emmett blazon are the unicorn, bull and fess. The four main tinctures (colors) are azure, sable, ermine and or.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The unicorn is an intresting example that is still part of our own mythology today. The unicorn as illustrated on even the most ancient coat of arms is still instantly recognisable to us today, and shares many of the same poses that both lions and horses can be found in. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn. Wade, the 18th century heraldic writer suggested that were adopted as symbols because of “its virtue, courage and strength”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85

Bulls, and their close relations, cows, calves, oxen and the buffalo are relatively recent additions to the art of heraldry (and it is not always possible to distinguish between them in their renderings). 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull They can be found in a variety of poses and may have horns, hooves and collared in a different colour. The writer Guillim noted that the prescence of a bull could signify ”valour and magnanimity”. 16A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

Emmett Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Emmett Name

Emmett Origin:

England

Origin of Emmett:

This interesting surname comes from old English and has two specific origins. The first origin of the name may derive from Emmot, a shortened nickname of the particular female name Emma, introduced into England by the Normans, with whom it was very famous. The other origin of the name is the of the Germanic word “Emma” or “Imma,” a diminutive form of women’s names. The first component “ermin, irmin,” means complete, whole or entire. The first instance of the name happened, frequently, before the invasion of 1066, when Emma, daughter of Richard, Duke of Normandy, married, first, King Ethelrede the Unready in 1002, and afterward married King Canute in 1017. In England, the particular name was famous from the 11th Century in the types as “Em” and “Emm,” with the different form Emmot listed many times in the 1273 Hundred Rolls. The name may also be geographical from Emmott in Lancashire, listed as “Emot” in 1296, and so introduced from the Olde English pre 7th Century “eagemot” which means “terminal of rivers.” One William de Emot listed in the 1324 “Court Rolls of Thomas, Earl of Lancaster.”

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Emmette, Eammett, Emmiett, Emmetti, Eemmett, Emmetty, Emmeott, Emmet, Emett, Emmtt.

England:

The name Emmett first organized in Lancashire where they held a family seat from early times; some say well before the Norman Invasion and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ranulph Emmott, which was dated 1332, in the “premium Rolls of Warwickshire.” It was during the time of King Edward III, who was known to be the “The Father of The Navy,” 1327 – 1377. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Emmett settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Emmett who settled in the United States in the 17th century included John Emmett who arrived in Virginia in 1654. Joane Emmett, who came to Virginia in 1657. Josias Emmett and his family brought land in Barbados in 1663. Small Emmett, who arrived in Virginia in 1665.

Some of the people with the name Emmett who settled in the United States in the 19th century included William Emmett, who came to Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1848. C L Emmett, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850. H L H Emmett, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1855.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Emmett who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Mr. Stephen Emmett U.E. “Emmet” who moved to Home District [York district], Ontario c. 1784.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Emmett who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Edward Emmett, an English prisoner from York, who shifted aboard the “Anson” in September 1843, arriving in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia. William Emmett, at the age of 35, came to South Australia in 1856 aboard the ship “Eliza.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Emmett who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Watson Emmett at the age of 21, who was a worker arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Oliver Lang” in 1856. Mary, Anthony, John, and Tilly Emmett, all landed in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Wanganui” in the same year in 1882.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Emmett: United States 4,175; England 3,490; Ireland 240; Australia 1,439; Scotland 151; Canada 442; South Africa 1,242; Germany 202; Philippines 322; New Zealand 156.

Notable People:

Arthur Emmett (Australian judge), was a great Justice and professor in Roman law.

Dan Emmett was an American writer.

Ed Emmett was an American leader.

Edward Nucella Emmett was an Australian merchant.

Henry James Emmett was a Tasmanian worker.

Rowland Emett, English sculptor and artist.

Sean Emmett is a British Professional Grand Prix motorcycle road racer.

Tom Emmett was an English cricket player during three decades – 1860, 1870 and early 1880.

Emmett Family Gift Ideas

Browse Emmett family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More emmett Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (Westminster, and Emmott co. Lancaster) Blazon: Per pale azure and sable a fesse engrailed ermine between three bulls' heads cabossed or. Crest—On a chapeau a unicorn's head erased all proper.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull
16. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse