Essington Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Essington Family Coat of Arms

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Essington Coat of Arms Meaning

Essington Name Origin & History

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essington coat of arms

Essington Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Essington blazon are the fusil, cinquefoil and griece. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and or .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The fusil is a shape rather like a lozenge but taller and narrower, hence fusily refers to a field of similar shapes arranged in a regulat pattern. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil It is though that the shape originally derived from that of a spindle of yarn. Wade believes that the symbol is of very great age and quotes an earlier writer, Morgan who ascribes it the meaning of “Negotiation”. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

Griece, or grice or degree refers to one of the steps on a calvary cross. Sometimes this type of cross has the precise number of steps carefully enumerated. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Grieces

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Essington Name

Origins of Essington:
Before the last few hundred years, the English language had no fast system of spelling rules. For that reason, spelling variations commonly appeared in early Anglo-Saxon surnames.  Over the years, many variations of the name Essington noted, including Essington, Esington, Easington, Essinton and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Eussington, Esington, Easington, Ossington, Essengton, Assignton, yesington, Isington, Whassington, Ausington.

England:
The surname Essington first appeared in South Staffordshire, at Essington, a hamlet and local church that dates back to 996 when it noted as Esingetun.  By the Domesday Book of 1086, the place name had changed to Eseningetone.  The Domesday Book recorded Bseningetone as part of the Cuttlestone hundred, land held by William fitzAnsculf and comprised 2 hides of land and was large enough for 6 ploughs.  Countess Godgifu held the Hundred at that time on behalf of fitzAnsculf.  The place name means “farmland or the family or supporters of a man called Esne,” from the Old English personal name “Inga” and “tun.”

United States of America:
Some of the people with the name Essington who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Essington, who landed in Virginia in the year 1635.  John Essington, who landed in New Jersey in the year 1681. The following century saw more Essington surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Essington who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Sarah Essington, who arrived in Virginia in the year 1703.

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Browse Essington family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Cowley, co. Gloucester; confirmed 28 July, 1610, by Segar, Garter). Ar. five fusils in cross or. Crest—A hand ppr. holding a fusil or.
2) (Ribbesford House, Bewdley, co. Worcester). Motto—Sea or land. Sa. on a cross ar. five fusils conjoined in cross az. Crest: On a mount vert a fusil fessways ar. in front of a cubit arm erect ppr. the hand holding a fusil.
3) (quartered by Haselrig, of Sutton Bonninton, co. Notts. William, son of Simon Haselrig, Lord of Haselrig, co. Leicester, temp. Henry V., m. the dau. and co-heir of Sir Robert Essington. Visit. Notts, 1569). Ar. two bars, and in chief three cinquefoils az.
4) (Halsted, co. Lincoln). Az. on a chev. betw. three grieces or, five mullets of the field. Crest—A horse's head erased ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Grieces