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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Notes: (co. Essex). Blazon: Sa. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis or.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Evens Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Evens Origin:

Wales

Origins of Evens:

This unusual surname, of old Welsh origin. It is a nickname form of the Welsh male given name Ifan or Evan, itself coming from "Iohannes" through the common "Iovannes," the Latin forms of John. The surname John has enjoyed great popularity in Europe all over the Christian period, being given in respect of St. John the Baptist, St. John the Evangelist, or the nearly one thousand other Holy persons of the name. The real derivation is from the Hebrew name "Yochanan" which means “Jehovah has blessed (me with a son)" or "may Jehovah bless this child." The surname Evans combines in the first part of the 16th Century, and in the new era takes the forms as Evans, Evens, Evins, Evance, Ifans, Ivings and Heavans. The name is well recorded in the "Document of National Biography" with over fifty entries, one of the most remarkable being Mary Ann Evans (1819 - 1880), who under the name of George Eliot, wrote "Silas Marner" and "Middlemarch," and many other famous works. William Evans, at the age of 23 yrs., who shifted from London on the ship "America" obligated for Virginia in July 1635, was one of the oldest recorded name ancestors to settle in the New World.

Variations:

More common variations are: Eavens, Evenes, Eveans, Eivens, Evenas, Evenis, Evens, Evaens, Evenso, Evoens.

England:

The origins of the surname Evens found in Herefordshire where people held a family seat from early times. Some say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Yevans, dated about 1533, in the "Records of Monmathshire". It was during the time of King Henry V111, who was known to be the “Bluff King Hal", dated 1509-1547. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Evens had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Evens settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the individuals with the name Evens landed in the United States in the 17th century included John Evens arrived in Virginia in 1619. Magdalan Evens, who came to Maryland in 1649-1652. Franc Evens, who landed in Maryland in 1661.

People with the surname Evens who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Edward Evens landed in Virginia in 1704. Richard Evens arrived in Baltimore, Maryland in 1720. William Evens came to Mississippi in 1798. Edward Evens arrived in Mississippi in 1798.

The following century saw many more Evens surnames come. Some of the population with the surname Evens who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Jacob Evens landed in America in 1806. Ezekiel Evens and George Evens, both arrived in New York in the same year 1812.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Evens who landed in Canada in the 18th century included Ebenezr Evens landed in Nova Scotia in 1750. Mary Evens landed in Nova Scotia in 1750. William Evens landed in Nova Scotia in 1750.

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Evens who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Joshua Evens arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship "Ballochmyle" in 1874. Edwin Evens arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship "Hindostan" in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Evens: Haiti 21,493; United States 2,732; Belgium 1,410; England 527; Dominican Republic 361; Canada 295; South Africa 274; France 208; Australia 202; Germany 134.

Notable People:

Bernt Evens (born 1978), is a Belgian professional soccer player.

Bob Evens (born 1947), is an English Anglican priest.

George Bramwell Evens (1884–1943), was a British radio announcer.

Evens Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Evens blazon are the chevron and fleur-de-lis. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and or.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 7, or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.8. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 9, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 10. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”11 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 12

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References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 2 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 4 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 5 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 6 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
  • 7 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 8 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 9 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
  • 10 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
  • 12 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
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