Everton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Everton Family Coat of Arms

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Everton Coat of Arms Meaning

Everton Name Origin & History

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Everton Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Everton blazon are the cross patonce, fleur-de-lis, fesse and pear. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and or .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross patonce is typical of these, whereby each arm of the cross expands and ends in a bud-like projection. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Everton Name

Everton Origin:

England

Origins of Everton:

This unique name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical surname acquiring from any one of the places called Everton in Bedfordshire, near Biggleswade in Lancashire, now forming a north-eastern district of Liverpool and in Nottinghamshire, near Bawtry. The place in Bedfordshire was noted as “Euretone” in the Domesday Book of 1086, as is the place in Nottinghamshire, while Everton in Lancashire shows as “Evretona” in Early Lancashire Charters of 1094. These places share similar meaning and origin, which is “the boar farm,” from the Olde English pre 7th Century “eofor,” which means hog, with “tun,” which means Hamlet, farmland, enclosure. Geographical surnames, like this, derived by local landholders, and the king of the castle, and particularly by those old citizens of a place who had shifted to another area and were there best recognized by the name of their mother town. Examples of the name from Parish Records contain the wedding of William Everton and Grissell Massone at St. Olave’s, Old Jewry, London, in January 1571, and the naming of Phillip, son of John Everton, at Holy Trinity, Chester, in Cheshire, in July 1607. A Royal symbol given to a family of the name represents a black stork, beaked gold, on a silver shield.

Variations:

More common variations are: Evertton, Yeverton, Evertone, Overton, Everdon, Averton, Uverton, Evarton, Iverton, Yverton

England:

The surname Everton first appeared in Lancashire, but other civils is quite possible as the name acquired from the Old English “eofor” and “tun” which meant “farmland where the wild boars seen.” Naturally, this Old English expression could apply to many locals. Although, the name has two quite different entries in the Domesday Book of 1086, Eureton in Bedfordshire, Evreton in Nottinghamshire and Everdone in Northamptonshire.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Alured de Euerton, dated about 1212, in the “Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199 – 1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Everton had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Everton landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Everton who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Sarnil Everton, who came to Virginia in 1665. Samuel Everton, who landed in Maryland in 1665.

The following century saw more Everton surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Everton who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included James Everton who came in New Orleans in 1823. Harnet Everton settled in Nantucket in 1823. John Everton, who landed in New York in 1830. Julia Everton arrived in Boston in 1850. A Everton at the age of 33, arrived in Texas in 1886.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Everton: Brazil 6,121; United States 1,143; England 903; South Africa 858; Algeria 536; Australia 234; Canada 153; New Zealand 102; France 86; Scotland 46

Notable People:

Chloe Everton, (b. 1979), is a British sports presenter.

Clive Harold Everton was born in September 1937. He is an old English veteran BBC snooker author, reporter, and old professional snooker player. He usually is considered as the official voice for snooker, on account of his knowledge of the game for over forty years.

James Everton, (b. 1992), is a British radio reporter.

John Scott Everton (March 1908–January 2003) was an American college administrator and politician. He got an education at Colgate University Divinity School, Cambridge, and Yale. He worked on the research staff at the Ford Foundation. He gave services as president of Kalamazoo College in 1949-53, and as U.S. Ambassador to Burma in 1961-63.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Balstead and Newton, co. Suffolk). Ar. on a fesse betw. three crosses patonce sa. as many fleurs-de-lis or. Crest—A buck’s head erased or, pellettee, attired sa.
2) (co. Warwick). Ar. on a fesse sa. three mullets of the field.
3) (Coleshill, co. Warwick. Her. Visit.). Sa. a chev. ar. betw. three pears or.
4) Ar. a stork sa. beaked or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse