Every Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Every Family Coat of Arms

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Every Coat of Arms Meaning

Every Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Every. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Every Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Every blazon are the chevronel and unicorn. The three main tinctures (colors) are erminois, gules and azure .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Readers may already be aware of the chevron, the large inverted ‘V’ shape that extends across the whole shield but may be new to its smaller cousin the chevronel. This can equally cover the whole width but is at least half the width of the chevron, if not narrower. 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevronel There can be multiple chevronels present, normally these are stacked vertically, but there is a very striking variant whereby the chevronels are said to be interlaced, in which case they are side-by-side, overlapping and intertwined, creating a very striking effect 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P124. In common with its larger relative, Wade associates the chevronel with the idea of “Protection…and a reward to one who has achieved a notable enterprise” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The unicorn is an intresting example that is still part of our own mythology today. The unicorn as illustrated on even the most ancient coat of arms is still instantly recognisable to us today, and shares many of the same poses that both lions and horses can be found in. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn. Wade, the 18th century heraldic writer suggested that were adopted as symbols because of “its virtue, courage and strength”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Every Name

Every Origin:

France

Origins of Every:

It is a French geographical name which originates from the town of Evreux in Normandy. Alternative surname spellings are Everie, Every, Everest, Everit Everex and Everix. The original name owners are thought to have been supporters of William the Conquerer in 1066 and documentation such as one John Everie, an observer at St. Mary Whitechapel, Stepney in 1677, suggests a possible “second wave” of Huguenot immigration. Although, the name in its “modern” spellings has held its own for some four hundred years. The recordings contain as Thomas Everye christened at Holy Trinity the Less, London in 1595 and William Every, an observer at Southill parish, Bedfordshire in July 1599.

Variations:

More common variations are: Eavery, Everay, Eveiry, Everry, Everye, Evaery, Eivery, Evry, Ever, Everhyi.

France:

The surname Every first appeared in the district of Northumberland where they held a family seat from old times. Rogerus filius Averary lived in the year 1166 and held lands and estates. One section of the family was discovered in Egginton, Derbyshire. “The parish [of Egginton], an old structure with a nave, chancel, aisles, and a neat low tower, consist of many buildings to the Every family, and has some survives of stained glass.”

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Every, dated about 1591, married Elizabeth Ouzely at ” St. Dunstan’s”, Stepney. It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth I, who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess,” dated 1558-1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Every had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Every landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Every who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Nicho Every, who came to Virginia in 1643. John Every, who landed in Maryland in 1649. William Every, who came to Maryland in 1663.

People with the surname Every who landed in the United States in the 19th century included Robert Every, who landed in New York in 1837. Johanna Every, who arrived in Texas in 1846. Ernest H. Every at the age of 26, who landed in America from Liverpool, in 1897. Llewellyn Every, at the age of 26, who landed in America from Llanelly, in 1899.

The following century saw more Every surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Every who came in the United States in the 20th century included Beatrice May Every, who settled in America, in 1903. Annie Every at the age of 27, who emigrated to the United States from Wales, in 1904. Lizzie A. Every at the age of 1, also immigrated to the United States from Wales, in the same year 1904. Ernest H Every at the age of 35, who moved to America from London, in 1905. Agnes Mabel Every, at the age of 36, who landed in America from London, in 1905.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Every who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Every landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1842.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Every: United States 1,699; England 694; Australia 473; South Africa 402; Netherlands 102; Brazil 64; Tanzania 61; Canada 52; India 48; Wales 45.

Notable People:

Dernell Every (1909–1994), was an American Olympic fencer.

George Every (1909–2003), was a British biographer and philosopher.

Henry Every (c. 1659–?), was an English criminal.

Matt Every (born 1983), is an American professional golf player. He was born in the year 1983.

Trevor Every (1909–1990), was a Welsh first-class cricket player.

Sir Simon Every, 1st Baronet (1603 – 1647) was an English legislator who sat in the House of Commons in 1640. He was a follower of the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Every Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Eggington, co. Derby, bart.). Motto—Suum cuique. Erminois two chevronels az. betw. two others gu. Crest—A demi unicor ar. guttee de sang and crined or.
2) (cos. Stafford, Somerset, and Devon; granted by Camden, Clarenceux, 1604). Or, four chevronels gu. Crest—A demi unicorn gu. crined, attired, and hoofed or.
3) (co. Kent). Or, five chevronels sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevronel
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P124
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85