Faber Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Faber Family Coat of Arms

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Faber Coat of Arms Meaning

Faber Name Origin & History

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Faber Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Faber blazon are the cross crosslet, bezant, mullet and rose. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, azure and or .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, being symetrical both vertically and horizontally and having an additional cross bar on each arm. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 14A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Faber Name

FABER

Faber is a variation of the medieval French surname, Fevre which was derived from the word “febre” the occupational name for a blacksmith or tradesman who was an iron-worked. The word “febre” found its origins in the Latin word “faber” which translates to craftsman.

Surnames had various sources of origins. Some people may have been identified by their given name plus their occupation while others may have been identified by their given name and one of their parent’s names. There was an endless supply from which surnames were culled, in addition to the use of patriarchal or matriarchal names or reference to the individuals occupation, there were things such as defining physical traits, a familiar geographical location or a topographical landmark found near the individuals home or birthplace, the name of the village in which the person lived, and much more.

The use of surnames; however, did not become a common practice among the general population until the mid-sixteenth century. Until this time, surnames were generally reserved solely for the noble class. The use of surnames were found to serve a practical purposes, aside from making the distinction between people with like given names easier, it also allowed governments to more effectively track people for census, tax and immigration purposes.

The task of record keeping was primarily under the jurisdiction of the Church, local priories, and the government. This was due in large part to the fact that literacy was a skill usually found only among the nobles, the clergy, and government officials and scribes. Even so, there often existed multiple variations of names which may be attributed to a number of factors; the origins of the surname, the lack of guidelines which existed for spelling, and the fact that many scribes who were charged with record keeping spelled phonetically, among other things.

One of the earliest records of anyone bearing the surname or any variation of its spelling is that of Roger le Fevere which appears in the Somerset tax rolls from 1243. The Pipe Rolls, often times called the “Great Rolls”, were a series of financial records kept by the English Treasury by order of King Henry III, with the oldest dating back seven hundred years to the 12th century. They hold the distinction of being the oldest consecutive set of records detailing English governance in the United Kingdom. Some other early variations of the name include; Faber; Fabar; Fabers; Faeber; Fabert; and Faybar among others.

With the discovery of the Americas and the addition to the British Common Wealth of countries such as Canada and Australia, immigration to these new worlds was inevitable. Some of the first recorded immigrants to America bearing the surname were Joseph Faber who arrived in 1635 and settled in New England. George Faber arrived in 1639 and settled in Boston, Massachusetts. There were also immigrants to the British Commonwealth countries of Canada, Australia, and New Zealand bearing the surname. Martin Faber landed in 1853 and settled in Adelaide, Australia.

Worldwide, the highest concentration of people with the surname Faber are found in Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Germany, Denmark and Austria. By state, the largest percentile of those with the surname Faber live in Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New York, and North Dakota.

There are many persons of note who bear the surname such as British born, The Reverend Father Frederick William Faber. He was a noted theologian and hymn writer, many of which are still sang in churches today. While Faber was raised as an Anglican he converted to Catholicism and entered the priesthood.

British born, Geoffrey Faber, was the nephew of The Reverend Father Frederick Faber and a noted academic, poet and publisher. Faber was educated at Christ Church, Oxford and was the founding editor of the one of the most noted literary publishing houses, Faber and Gwyer.

British born, Edmund Beckett Faber, 1st Baron of Faber, was educated at Eton and Trinity College, Cambridge. He served as Justice of the Peace and Deputy Lieutenant for the West Riding of Yorkshire. In 1905 he was created Baron Faber, of Butterwick in Lincoln County.

British born, Denison Faber, 1st Baron Wittenham, was a Member of British Parliament and was the younger brother of Edmund Beckett Faber, 1st Baron of Faber. Baron Faber died in 1931 at the age of 78. With his death, his title became extinct. He had no heirs of his body.

Faber Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. on a fesse sa. three crosses crosslet or, a bordure az. bezantee.
2) (physician to King Charles II.). Per fess ar. and az. two mullets in chief sa. in base a rose or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
14. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105