Fane Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Fane Family Coat of Arms

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Fane Coat of Arms Meaning

Fane Name Origin & History

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Fane Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Fane blazon are the gauntlet, griffin and bull. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The gauntlet is an armoured glove, part of a knights attire and when used as a device on the shield it should be stated which hand it is for. 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gauntlet They are quite a complex device visually, with distinct panels and rivets visible. Wade tells us, probably with good reason that it represents “a man armed for performance of a martial enterprise”. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]10Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

Bulls, and their close relations, cows, calves, oxen and the buffalo are relatively recent additions to the art of heraldry (and it is not always possible to distinguish between them in their renderings). 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull They can be found in a variety of poses and may have horns, hooves and collared in a different colour. The writer Guillim noted that the prescence of a bull could signify ”valour and magnanimity”. 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Fane Name

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Earl of Westmorland). Motto—Ne vile fano. (Wormsley, co. Oxford, a branch of the noble house of Westmorland; descended from Henry Fane, Esq., brother of the eighth Earl, by Charlotte, his wife, dau. and co-heir of Richard Luther, Esq., of Myles’s, co. Essex). Az. three dexter gauntlets, backs affrontee or. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a bull’s head ar. pied sa. armed of the first, charged on the neck with a rose gu. barbed and seeded ppr. Supporters—Dexter, a griffin per fesse ar. and or, gorged with a plain collar and lined sa.; sinister, a bull ar. pied sa. collared and lined or, at the end of a line a ring and three staples of the last.
2) (Viscount Fane; created 1718, extinct 1766). Same Arms and Crest. Supporters—Two leopards guard, ppr. collared or.
3) (Fulbeck, co. Lincoln). Same Arms. Crest—A gauntlet or, holding a sword ppr. hilt and pommel gold.
4) (Hamlyn-Fane, Clovelly Court, co. Devon, borne by Nevile Hamlin Batson Fane, son of Col. Henry Edward Hamlyn-Fane, by Susan Hester, his wife, dau. of Sir James Hamlyn-Williams, last bart. of Clovelly). Motto over—Pro rege, lege, grege. Az. three dexter gauntlets, backs affrontee or. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a bull's head ar. pied sa. armed of the first, charged on the neck with a rose gu. barbed and seeded ppr.
5) (Ponsonby-Fane, Brympton Park, co. Somerset; as exemplified to the Hon. Spencer Ponsonby, C.B., on his assuming, by royal licence, the surname and arms of Fane). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. three dexter gauntlets or, for Fane; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a chev. betw. three combs ar., for Ponsonby. Crests—1st, Fane: Out of a ducal coronet or, a pied bull's head ppr. charged on the neck with a rose gu. Motto over—Ne vile fano. 2nd, Ponsonby: On a ducal coronet az. three arrows, one in pale and two in saltire, points downwards, entwined with a snake ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Gauntlet
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P93
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
10. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bull
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P117