Gardiner Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Gardiner Family Coat of Arms

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Gardiner Coat of Arms Meaning

Gardiner Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Gardener, Gardner.

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Gardiner Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Gardiner blazon are the griffin, mullet, bucks’ head and escallop. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, gules and azure .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]10Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 12A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The chief is an area across the top of the field 14Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It appears in many different forms and can itself be charged with other charges and ordinaries, 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief, being treated almost as if it were a completely separate area. In its simplest form it can be clearly identified. Early examples include the award by Henry III of England to the knight Robert de MORTEYN BRETON of Ermine, a chief gules.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Gardiner Name

GARDINER

The English surname has its origins in the medieval French word “gardin” which translates to small clearing or garden, as such, it was usually a name applied to a person who was a gardener or lived near a garden. The name is thought to have migrated to the British Isles after the Norman Invasion in 1066.

The first recording of the surname, William le Gardiner appears in the Rutland tax records dated 1199. These rolls, were a series of census and tax records kept by the English Treasury by order of King John, with the oldest dating back to the 12th century. They hold the distinction of being the oldest consecutive set of records detailing English governance in the United Kingdom. These records span a period of over 700 years

Surnames in Europe prior to the late 16th century were largely unheard of. In the small settlements and villages which existed during earlier times, residents found little need for surnames as everyone in these communities new each other and a given name would usually suffice. However, with the passage of time, population growth and expansions of communities as villages gave way to towns and cities, it became necessary to add a qualifier to a people’s names to distinguish them, one from another. Therefore one person may have been identified by their given name plus their occupation while another may have been identified by their given name and one of their parent’s names. The introduction of surnames by the aristocracy seemed to be the next logical step in this evolution. There was a endless supply from which surnames could be formed, in addition to the use of patriarchal/matriarchal names or reference to the individuals occupation, there were things such as defining physical traits, a familiar geographical location or a topographical landmark found near the individuals home or birthplace, the name of the village in which the person lived, and so much more. Soon, surnames would come not just to represent an individual but whole families.

There often exists variations in spelling of many surnames, as with many given names which date back to the early centuries. The variation in spelling of both given and surnames during this time period can be attributed to a lack of continuity regarding guidelines for spelling which was compounded by the diversity of languages in use in European countries at this time. The variations in the spelling of the surname include but not limited to; Gardiner; Gartner; Gartnor; Gardnor; and Gardner among others.

The use of surnames aside from making the distinction between individuals with common first names also allowed for the government to have a more accurate method of record keeping for taxes, censuses, and immigration which greatly increased with the discovery of America and the addition of countries to the British Commonwealth such as; Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

One of the first recorded immigrants to America bearing the surname or any variation of the spelling was Christopher Gardiner who arrived in 1630 and settled in New England and Lyon Gardiner landed and settled in Saybrook, Long Island in 1635.

There were also many immigrants to the British Commonwealth countries of Canada, Australia, and New Zealand bearing the surname. Edward Gardiner landed in 1784 and settled in Saint John, New Brunswick. Thomas Gardiner landed in 1821 and settled in New South Wales, Australia. William Gardiner landed in 1840 and settled in Bay of Islands.

Worldwide, the highest concentration of people with the surname Gardiner are found in Australia, New Zealand, the United Kingdom, Ireland, and Canada. By state, the largest percentile of those with the surname Gardiner live in Maine, Connecticut, Maryland, Idaho, and Utah.

There are many persons of note who bear the surname such as British born politician and journalist, Sir George Arthur Gardiner.

British born Member of Parliament and Lord High Chancellor of Great Britian, Gerald Gardiner, Baron Gardiner.

British born conductor of classical music, Sir John Eliot Gardiner, CBE(Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire.

Irish born landowner, politician and Member of the Irish Privy Council, Luke Gardiner, 1st Viscount Mountjoy. His son Charles John Gardiner succeeded to his title as the 2nd Viscount Mountjoy, and was also created the Earl of Blessington in the Irish aristocracy. Both titles became extinct upon the death of the Charles John Gardiner in 1829. The 2nd Viscount’s wife Irish born novelist, journalist, and literary hostess, Marguerite Gardiner, Countess of Blessington was a leading literary figure of her time, with a friendships with noted poet Lord Byron and French artist Count d’Orsay.

British born, Sir Richard Gardiner who was Lord Mayor of London, Alderman of Walbrook Ward, and Sheriff of the City of London.

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Browse Gardiner family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Himbleton, co. Worcester; granted by Cooke, Clarenceux, 1592, to Richard Gardener, Esq., of that place). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three pomegranates ppr. leaved vert. Crest—Out of a mural crown or, an armed arm embowed ppr. holding in the hand a flagstaff, thereon a split pennon gu. flowing to the sinister, charged with two staves in saltire, fired gold.
2) (Histon, co. Cambridge; Kokesforth, co. Norfolk; and Shrewsbury). Per fesse ar. and sa. a pale counterchanged three griffins' heads erased of the second. Crest—A griffin’s head erased sa.
3) (Berwick-on-Tweed; granted 24 April, 1580). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three buglehorns ar. stringed or. Crest—On a book sanguine, clasped and garnished or, a falcon volant of the last.
4) (Calais). Or, on a chev. gu. betw. three griffins' heads erased az. two lions pass. respecting each other ar.
5) (Northall, co. Lincoln). Same Arms, the lions gold. Crest—A Turk’s head ppr. turban or and az.
6) Sa. a chev. betw. three half spades ar.
7) (Thomas Gardener, citizen of London. Visit. 1568). Quarterly, gu. and az. in the second and third quarters a griffin segreant or, holding in the dexter claw a ring gemmed of the last, over all on a bend cotised of the last a leopard's face, holding in the mouth a round buckle betw. two fleurs-de-lis gu. Crest—A leopard pass. ar. pellettee, holding in the dexter paw a pine apple or, stalked and leaved vert.
8) (Wallingham and Bishop’s Norton, co. Lincoln). Or, on a chev. gu. betw. three griffins' heads erased az. two lions combatant ar. Crest—A Saracen's head full faced ppr. erased at the neck gu. wreathed about the temples of the last and az. on his head a cap or.
9) (London). Per chev. ar. and purp. in chief three escallops az. in base a griffin's head erased or, on a chief of the second a cross formee betw. two griffins’ heads erased of the first.
10) (Earl of Blessington, extinct 1829). Motto—Nil desperandum. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a fesse chequy ar. and az. betw. three lions pass. sa.; 2nd and 3rd, or, a griffin pass. az. on a chief sa. three pheons’ heads ar. Crest—An eagle's head erased betw. two wings. Supporters—Dexter, a man in complete armour garnished or, on hit cap three feathers, two ar. and one gu.; sinister, a queen in her royal vestments gu. girded az. over all a mantle purp. doubled erm. her feet bare, hair dishevelled, and ducally crowned or.
11) (Bishop of Winchester; Stephen Gardiner, appointed 1531, deprived 1550, restored 1553, d. 1556). Az. on a cross or, betw. four griffins’ heads erased ar. a cinquefoil pierced gu.
12) (Bishop of Lincoln; John Gardiner, appointed 1695, d. 1705). Or, a buck's head cabossed gu. betw. the attires a mullet of the last.
13) (Rev. Robert Barlow Gardiner, M.A., formerly Vicar of Wadhurst, co. Sussex). Same Arms, with a canton az. thereon a mitre of the first, labelled ar. Crest—A stag's head cabossed ppr. betw. the attires a mullet sa. pierced and pendent from a chain or.
14) (cos. Berks and Buckingham). Gu. a chev. betw. three griffins’ heads erased ar. a chief crenellee or. Crest—A griffin's head erased az. charged with three bends or.
15) (Blandford, co. Dorset). Per fesse embattled az. and purp. on a chev. or, betw. three griffins’ heads erased ar. as many escallops sa. Crest—A griffin's head erased bendy of six az. and purp.
16) (Tollesbury, co. Essex). Ar. a griffin segreant sa. Crest—A griffin pass. reguard. sa.
17) (Ivingsbury, co. Herts). Per pale or and gu. a fesse betw. three hinds pass. counterchanged.
18) (Cudsden, co. Oxford; Sir Thomas GaRdiner, Knt., Solicitor-General to Charles I.; d. Oct. 1652). Per pale gu. and or, a fesse betw. three hinds tripping counterchanged.
19) (Thundridgbury, co. Herts). Per pale or and gu. on a fesse betw. three hinds pass, as many lozenges all counterchanged. Crest—Two halberts in pale, enwrapped round by a snake ppr.
20) (London). Per pale or and gu. a fesse betw. three hinds trippant all counterchanged. Crest—A Saracen's head sidefaced ppr. erased at the shoulders gu. wreathed round the temples ar. and of the second.
21) (Wigan, co. Lancaster). Or, on a chev. gu. betw. three griffins’ heads erased az. two lions counter pass, of the field.
22) (London). Same Arms. Crest—A man’s head ppr. thereon a cap gu. turned up ar. crined and bearded sa.
23) (Coombe Lodge, co. Oxford). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, same Arms, for Gardiner; 2nd and 3rd, gu. on a cross or, five mullets sa., for Boddam. Crest—A griffin's head erased. Motto—Deo non fortunae.
24) (Lord Mayor of London, 1478). Purp. on a chev. ar. three escallops az. on a chief embattled of the third a cross potent or, betw. two griffins' heads erased of the second.
25) (London, and Beccles, co. Norfolk). Gu. a chev. betw. three tigers’ heads erased or. Crest—A rhinoceros pass. ar.
26) (certified at the College of Arms, London, May, 1779). Motto—Persevere. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, a griffin pass, with wings endorsed az. on a chief sa. three pheons ar.; 2nd and 3rd, gu. a fesse chequy ar. and az. betw. three lions ramp. or. Crest—A griffin’s head or, gorged with a chaplet of laurel vert betw. two wings expanded az.
27) (co. Oxford, 1578). Az. a chev. erm. betw. three griffins' heads erased ar. (another, or). Crest—A stork ppr. Another Crest—A griffin sejant, resting his dexter foot on a book sa.
28) (Richard Gardiner, D.D., and Canon of Christ Church, Oxford, d. 20 Dec. 1670). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. two griffins’ heads erased in chief and a cross formee in base or.
29) (Letherhead, co. Surrey). Sa. a chev. betw. three buglehorns stringed ar. on a pile in chief of the second a covered cup gu. a bordure or, charged with eight pellets. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a goat's head gu. attired gold.
30) (Haling and Peckham, co. Surrey). Az. a griffin pass. or.
31) (temp. Henry VIII.). Per fesse ar. and sa. a pale and three goats’ heads erased all counterchanged.
32) (Reg. Ulster’s Office, to Sir Robert Gabdiner, Chief Justice of the King’s Bench, 1586-1604). Gu. a chev. betw. three heraldic tigers' heads erased or.
33) (Dublin; granted by Carney, Ulster, 1683, to William Gardiner, of that city, merchant). Or, a griffin pass, wings expanded az. on a chief sa. three pheons points down ar. Crest—A griffin’s head couped or, betw. two wings az. gorged with a chaplet vert. Motto—Honor rewards industry.
34) (Madras, 1789). Motto—Omnia superat virtus. Ar. on a fret gu. a rose in every interstice of the second, barbed vert, betw. four hearts or, a bordure az. Crest—Out of a mural crown or, seven battle axes ppr. one in fess and the rest in bend dexter and bend sinister.
35) (King’s Brompton, co. Somerset, High Sheriff of that co. in 1737). Gu. a plain fesse with cotises engr. ar betw. four roses, three in chief and one in base of the last Crest—A stag ppr. the dexter foreleg supporting an scutcheon ar. charged with four lozenges conjoined in fesse gu. betw. two barrulets sa.
36) (Baron Gardner). Motto—Valet anchora virtus. Or, on a chev. gu. betw. three griffins' heads erased, az. an anchor erect betw. two lions guard, counter-pass, of the field. Crest—A demi griffin az. collared and lined, and supporting in the claws an anchor or. Supporters—Two griffins, wings elevated az. beaked, membered, and gorged with a naval coronet or, each resting the interior hind foot on an anchor, with cable sa.
37) (Chatteris House, Isle of Ely, co. Cambridge). Motto—Fide et amore. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. on a saltire betw. three griffins' heads erased, one in chief, two in fesse sa. and a woolpack in base az. another saltire or, for Gardner; 2nd and 3rd, az. on a chev. or, betw. two boars’ heads erased in chief and a padlock in base ar. a lozenge gu. with two keys chevronwise sa., for Dunn. Crests—1st, Gardner: A griffin’s head erased ar. surmounted by two branches of laurel in saltire ppr.; 2nd, Dunn: Two swords in saltire, the points upwards ppr. pommels and hilts or, tied with a riband vert pendent therefrom a key sa.
38) (Rev. Laurence Gardner, D.D., Sansaw, Shrewsbury). Per fesse ar. and sa. a pale counterchanged three griffins’ heads erased of the second. Crest—A griffin’s head erased sa.
39) (cos. Lincoln and Salop). Same Arms. Crest—An elephant's head erm. eared sa. armed or.
40) (Lord Mayor of London; and of Suffolk). Per fesse or and sa. a pale counterchanged, and three griffins’ heads erased of the second.
41) (Tunbridge Wells, co. Kent). Az. on a chev. betw. three griffins’ heads erased ar. as many martlets sa. Crest—A griffin’s head erased gorged with a mural coronet.
42) (co. Middlesex). Sa. a chev. betw. three buglehorns stringed ar. Crest—A reindeer’s head ar. attired or.
43) (Kirkton, co. Lincoln). Az. a chev. betw. three buglehorns ar.
44) (co. Lincoln, and Wallbearswick, co. Suffolk). Quarterly, ar. and sa. in the 2nd and 3rd quarters a griffin’s head erased or. Crest—An elephant’s head couped erm.
45) (Wallingham and Bishop’s Norton, co. Lincoln). Or, on a chev. gu. betw. three griffins' heads erased az. two lions combatant ar. Crest—A Saracen's head full faced ppr. erased at the neck gu. wreathed about the temples of the last and az. on his head a cap or.
46) (London). Per chev. ar. and purp. in chief three escallops az. in base a griffin's head erased or, on a chief of the second a cross formee betw. two griffins’ heads erased of the first.
47) (co. Worcester). Per chev. az. and gu. on a chev. betw. three lions' heads erased ar. as many escallops sa.
48) (London). Gu. on a bend cotised or, a leopard’s face betw. two fleurs-de-lis of the first.
49) (co. Somerset). Sa. a chev. betw. three spades ar.
50) (Stoke-Ash, co. Suffolk). Ar. on a chev. gu. betw. three griffins' heads erased az. two lions ramp. or.
51) (co. Herts; Richard Gardner, Sergeant-at-Arms to Henry VIII., his brother, William Gardner, of Bermond­sey Street, d. 1597; sons of William Gardner, co. Herts. Visit. London). Az. a griffin pass. or. Crest—On a ducal coronet or, a lion pass. guard. ar. (another, a demi unicorn erased ar. crowned and horned or, crined sa.).
52) (Bermondsey, co. Surrey). Same Arms. Crest—A demi unicorn erased or, crined and armed sa. ducally crowned or. Another Crest—On a ducal coronet or, a lion pass. guard. ar.
53) Or, a griffin pass. az. on a chief sa. three pheons ar. Crest—A griffin’s head couped or, gorged with a chaplet vert betw. two wings az.
54) Vert a griffin pass, and a chief or.
55) Az. a griffin pass. or. Crest—A demi unicorn or, maned sa. crowned ar. horned gold.
56) (Ruspar, co. Sussex. Visit. 1634). Az. on a chev. ar. betw. three griffins’ heads erased or, as many martlets sa.
57) Per fesse gu. and ar. six pales wavy counterchanged.
58) Per pale or and gu. on a fesse betw. three hinds two lozenges all counterchanged.
59) Ar. a griffin’s head erased sa.
60) (granted to Robert Panting, Esq., upon his assuming, by royal licence, the name of Gardner). Per fesse ar. and sa. a pale counterchanged three gryphons’ heads erased of the second.
61) Gu. a bend vair double cotised or.
62) (Torwoodhead, co. Stirling). Motto—In virtute et fortuna. Gu. on a fret of four pieces gu. as many hearts az. and in every interstice a rose of the second. Crest—A griffin’s head erased ppr.
63) (Edinburgh, 1784). Motto—Virtute et fortuna. Same Arms, a crescent or, in chief for diff. Crest—A griffin’s head erased ppr. charged with a crescent or.
64) (Beechfield, Croxteth Road, Liverpool, and Fluke Hall, Fleetwood, co. Lancaster; Richard Cardwell Gardner, Esq., J.P., Alderman of Liverpool for 25 years, and Mayor, 1862-3, vi. 1828, the dau. and heiress of John Sykes, Esq., of Fluke Hall, and d. 29 Dec. 1882, leaving John Sykes Gardner, six other sons, and three daus.). Per fesse gu. and or, a pale three griffins' heads erased (two and one) and as many roses (one and two), all counterchanged, an escutcheon of pretence for Sykes, viz., sa. a fountain ppr. betw. three molehills or. Crest—In front of two half spades in saltire a griffin's head erased all ppr. Motto—Animo et fide.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
10. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
12. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief