Garden Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Garden Family Coat of Arms

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Garden Coat of Arms Meaning

Garden Name Origin & History

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Garden Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Garden blazon are the bar, label, basket and boar’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bar is a thin, horizontal stripe across the centre of the shield 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar, usually in groups of two or three (any more and there would be confusion with barry, a treatment of horizontal lines of alternating colours). Bars can be a distinctive and easily recognised device, early examples include those awarded by Henry III of England to the family MAUDYT Argent, two bars gules.

The label holds a special place in heraldry, originlly being a temporary mark, used by the oldest son while his father was still alive. In appearance it is a horizontal bar near the top of the shield from which descend 3 or 5 “points” or small rectangles descending from the bar. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label In more recent use it has come to used as charge in its own right 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154 and may have additional charges on each point, which can create a pleasing visual effect.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The humble but useful basket is a typical example of this. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Garden Name

Garden Origin:

England

Origins of Garden:

This interesting surname is listed as Garden and Gardyne, both metonymic for a gardner, and Gardener, Gardenner, Gardiner, Gardinor, Gairdnar, Gairner, and Gardner, are from French sources. Listed widely in England, Ireland, and Scotland, it is both a position and a professional name and refers to the senior gardener of a noble or even royal house. It was acquired from the Northern French word “gardin” and brought into the British Islands after the Norman Conquest of 1066. It is itself a shortened form of the pre 7th-century Germanic word “gard,” which means an enclosure. The function of the “gardiniere” in old times was a very significant one. He was answerable for the kitchen garden, which provided almost the only source of fresh food and plants, and so, played an important part in cultivating the health of the domestic matters. The use of the word “gardener” relates to one who takes care for beautiful lawns and flower beds. Interesting examples of old surname documentations contain as William le Gardinier of the district of Rutland in 1199, William Gardin of Huntingdon in 1218, and John atte Gardyne of Sussex in the Premium Tax Rolls of that division in the year 1296.

Variations:

More common variations are: Gaurden, Gairden, Gardien, Gaarden, Gardeni, Gardena, Gardean, Gardeyn, Gardeen, Garaden.

Scotland:

The surname Garden first appeared in Angus, part of the Tayside region of northeastern Scotland, and now Conference Area of Angus, anciently known as Forfar or Forfarshire, where they held a family seat from old times.

England:

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William del Gardin, dated about 1183, in the “Charters of Oxfordshire.” The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Garden had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Garden landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Garden who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included George Garden settled in Virginia in 1649.

People with the surname Garden who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Alexander Garden, who arrived in South Carolina in the year 1743.

The following century saw many more Garden surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Garden who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Joseph Garden arrived in New York in the year 1823.

Canada:

Individuals with the surname Garden settled in Canada in two different centuries respectively in 18th and 19th Some of the people with the name Garden who came to Canada in the 18th century included Mr. William Garden U.E. who settled in Fredericton, New Brunswick near the year 1784.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Garden who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Frederick Garden arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Lady Emma” in the year 1837.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Garden: United States 2,457; Bangladesh 2,063; Vietnam 1,590; England 1,527; Cambodia 1,368; Pakistan 1,257; Brazil 1,240; Scotland 1,155; South Africa 1,132; Turkey 1,083.

Notable People:

Alex Garden is a computer game developer and business person.

Alexander Garden (naturalist) (1730–1791), was known by the botanical author abbreviation “Garden.”

Alexander Garden (poet), is a Scottish poet from Aberdeenshire.

Francis Garden, Lord Gardenstone (1721–1793), was a Scottish justice.

Francis Garden (theologian) (1810–1884), was an English philosopher.

Graeme Garden (born 1943), is a British comedian and performer.

James Garden (1847–1914), was an engineer and administrator of Vancouver.

Jock Garden (1882–1968), was a founder of Australia’s communist party.

Mary Garden (1874–1967), was a Scottish-American operatic soprano.

Nancy Garden (1938–2014), was an American writer of children’s and young adult literature.

Garden Family Gift Ideas

Browse Garden family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Cambridge). Ar. two bars sa. a label gu.
2) Az. three baskets or. Crest—A mallard amongst flags all ppr.
3) (that Ilk). Ar. two chev. engr. gu.
4) (that Ilk, co. Forfar). Motto—Cruciata cruce junguntur. Ar. a boar’s head erased sa. armed or. Crest—Two dexter hands conjoined ppr. holding a cross crosslet fitchee or.
5) (Troup, co. Banff, now Garden-Campbell). Motto—Vires animat virtus. Ar. a boar's head erased sa. armed gu., now quartered with Campbell, of Glenlyon. See that name. Crest—A boar pass. ar.
6) (Borrowfield, co. Forfar). Motto—Vive le roi. Ar. a boar's head erased sa. betw. three mullets gu. Crest—A dexter hand holding a palm branch disposed in orle ppr.
7) (Leys, co. Forfar). Ar. a boar's head erased sa. betw. three cross crosslets fitchee gu.
8) (Minister of Balmerino, 1678). Motto—Sustina et abstine. The same, within a bordure counter compony sa. and ar. Crest—A rose slipped ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bar
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100