Glass Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Glass Family Coat of Arms

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Glass Coat of Arms Meaning

Glass Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Glas.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Glass. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Glass Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Glass blazon are the fleur-de-lis, mullet, rose and mermaid. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Glass Name

Glass Origin:

Scotland, England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Glass is determined to be an uncommon one, but was recorded throughout Scotland, even though it is of Anglo-Saxon origin. This surname of Glass is said to be used as an occupational surname for someone who was a glazier or a glass blower. This surname of Glass derives from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “glaes” which can be translated to mean the word “glass,” although this particular Old English word sometimes was spelled “glaed” which actually was translated to meant the bright shine of glass, rather than the actual object itself. In Scotland, this surname comes from the Old Gaelic word “glas” which can be translated to mean the colors of “grey” “green” and “blue.”

Variations:

More common variations are:

Glas, Glasse, Glassy, Glasso, Gllass, Glaess, Glauss, Galass, Glyass, Glassi, Glassa

History:

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Glass was in the 16th century, when half of the lands of Langilculcreich belonged to onle Alexander Glass in the year of 1506. Those who bear this surname of Glass and live in the country of Scotland can be found all over this country. However, the areas of Scotland where there is a high concentration of people who are known to bear the surname of Glass are Lanarkshire, Midlothian, Angus, Aberdeenshire, Fife, Perthshire, and Renfrewshire counties.

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Glass in England was in the year 1540. In this year of 1540, one person with the name of Ricardus Glase was married to Margeriam Higgons at Pontesbury in Shropshire, on the date of October 11. This marriage was unified under the reign of one King Henry VIII, who was known as and commonly referred to throughout history as “Bluff King Hal” and ruled from the year of 1509 to the year 1547. Those who bear the surname of Glass and reside in England are in high concentrations throughout the country, as well as spilling over into Wales. These areas of high concentration are Nurthumberland, Durham, Lanarkshire, Devon, Hampshire, Wiltshire, and the city of London.

United States of America:

In the 17th Century, European citizens began to emigrate to the United States in search of a new and better life. The United States of America was a popular destination for these disgruntled English and European settlers because the area was largely unexplored, and promised freedoms that were not afforded to these citizens in the country of their birth. During this European Migration, the first recorded person to reach the United States whose surname was Glass was one Duncan Glass, who settled in the state of Virginia with his wife, Mary Glass, in the year 1651. It is possible that someone who bore the surname of Glass attempted to make the journey to the New World before the year of 1650, but were not able to make it because of the living conditions on the vessels of transport. Many people who arrived in the United States in the 1600’s arrived starving and riddled with diseases. Those who bear the surname of Glass are found in New York, Pennsylvania, Virginia, Texas, Illinois, Ohio, Kentucky, New Jersey, Georgia and Alabama.

Glass Today:

United States 48,921

England 5,087

Germany 3,833

South Africa 3,415

Australia 2,447

Canada 2,258

Pakistan 1,509

Brazil 1,367

Israel 1,249

Scotland 1,227

Notable People:

Bradley McConnell Glass (1931-2015) who was a Member of the Illinois House of Representatives in the year 1971, and was an American politician

Noah Glass, who was the co-founder of Twitter, and is a software developer from America

Hermann Glass (1878-1961) who was an Olympic gold medalist for gymnastics at the 1904 Summer Games, from America

Rear Admiral Henry Glass (1844-1908) who was a naval officer best remembered for his role in the bloodless capture of Guam in the Spanish-American War

Presley Thornton Glass (1824-1902) who was a member of the United States House of Representatives and was an American politician

Julia Glass (born in 1956) who was a writer from America who won the National Book Award in the year 2002

Joanna McClelland Glass (born in 1936) who was an American playwright that was Canadian-born

Philip Glass (born in 1937) who was a Academy Award nominated composer from America

Hiriam Bentley Glass (1906-2005) who was a geneticist and noted columnist from America

Mr. David Reuben Glass, who was a Marine from Britain and sailed on the HMS Price of Wales and survived the sinking

Glass Family Gift Ideas

Browse Glass family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Sauchie, Scotland). Motto—Luctor, non mergor. Ar. a fleur-de-lis betw. three mullets within a bordure gu. Crest—A mermaid with mirror and comb ppr
2) (East Indies; representative of Sauchie, 1812). Motto—Luctor, non mergor. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a fleur-de-lis betw. three mullets gu. a bordure of the last; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on a bend az. betw. two roses gu. barbed vert, three buckles or. Crest—As the last. Supporters—Two horses ar. saddled and bridled ppr. the housing gu. fringed or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133