Glazebrook Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Glazebrook Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Glazebrook Coat of Arms Meaning

Glazebrook Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Glazebrook. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

glazebrook coat of arms

Glazebrook Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Glazebrook blazon are the lion passant, fleur-de-lis and chief. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, sable and gules .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

The chief is an area across the top of the field 16Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40. It appears in many different forms and can itself be charged with other charges and ordinaries, 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief, being treated almost as if it were a completely separate area. In its simplest form it can be clearly identified. Early examples include the award by Henry III of England to the knight Robert de MORTEYN BRETON of Ermine, a chief gules.

Glazebrook Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Glazebrook Name

Glazebrook Origin:

England

Origins of Glazebrook:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the name, this interesting and unique name was listed as Glazebrook, Glasebrook, Glasbrook, Glassbrooke, and perhaps more, this is an English geographical surname. It acquires from Glazebrook, a hamlet near the town of Warrington in the division of Cheshire. The name means “shiny (or probably clear) water.” Geographical Surnames are regularly “from” names. That is to say, names are given either to the local king of the palace and his ancestors or frequently after the 14th century when labor was becoming more free, to people as an easy classification of a foreigner, after they departed from their real hamlet to live in another place. Spelling being at best average and local languages very thick, often lead to the production of “sounds like” forms. It seems to have been the case here, with the first known recording being that of Elena de Glazebrok listed in the census Tax record for the division of Yorkshire in 1379. The name also traveled down to London, and we have a documentation in the time of King Charles 11nd (1660 – 1685) of Mary Glasebrooke, the daughter of Robert Glasebrooke, who named at the parish of St Mary Backchurch, in the city of London, in 1675.

Variations:

More common variations are: Glazbrook, Glazebrooke, Glaizebrook, Glazebrok, Glazebrooke, Glazabrook, Glazbbrook, Galzebrook, Glazbroke, Glozebroke

England:

The surname Glazebrook first appeared in Yorkshire where they held a family seat as Kings of the palace of Greysbrook or Greasborough, some say, from the time of the Norman Invasion in the year 1066 AD. On the record in near the year 1100, was Bartholemew de Gresbroke who bought a land in Shenston in Staffordshire from Robert of Grendon, and it considered that from this line declined the Greysbrooks of Middleton, Warwickshire, who arrived there in the early 15th century. Rixton-with-Glazebrook is a civil church in the unitary authority of Warrington, Cheshire. The church records back to at least 1227 when it noted as Glasbro c. It acquired from Glaze Brook, a Celtic river-name meaning “grey- green” having acquired from the Old English word broc.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Glazebrook had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the individuals with the name Glazebrook who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included George Glazebrook at the age of 40, landed in New York in the year 1812. Charles Glazebrook, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in the year 1830.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Glazebrook: United States 980; England 796; Australia 321; Canada 117; South Africa 91; New Zealand 64; Wales 56; Scotland 26; Spain 8; Thailand 2.

Notable People:

Otis Allan Glazebrook (1845 – 1931), was an American Representative.

Michael George Glazebrook was a Headmaster of Clifton College, after that a Canon of Ely, and named to have once held the world record for the high jump.

Sir Richard Tetley Glazebrook KCB KCVO FRS (September 1854– December 1935) was an English scientist.

Major Philip Kirkland Glazebrook, DSO (December 1880–March 1918) was a British businessperson and Conservative leader. He was the son of John K. and Cecilia Glazebrook of Twemlow Hall, Holmes Church, Cheshire, and trained at Eton College and New College, Oxford. He was a partner in the firm of Spurrier and Glazebrook Limited, oil merchants, Manchester. He held the rank of captain in the Cheshire Yeomanry.

Robert E. Glazebrook was born in March 1956 in Fresno, California. He is an old professional American football player who played safety for six seasons for the Atlanta Falcons.

Karl Glazebrook is a stargazer, known for his work on galaxy structure, for playing a key role in improving the nod and shuffle technique for doing spectroscopy with large telescopes, and for starting the Perl Data Language (PDL).

Dame Susan Gwynfa Mary Glazebrook, DNZM was born in February 1956. He is a justice of the Supreme Court of New Zealand.

Hugh de Twenbrokes Glazebrook (1855-1937), was a British artist and brother of Michael George Glazebrook.

Glazebrook Family Gift Ideas

Browse Glazebrook family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More glazebrook Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Glazebrook, and other parts of co. Lancaster, and Toronto, Canada). Motto—Dum spiro spero. Or, a lion pass. sa. on a chief gu. three fleurs-de-lis ar. Crest—A demi lion ramp. gu. ducally crowned or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489
16. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 40
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chief