Gough Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Gough Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Gough Coat of Arms Meaning

Gough Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Goghe.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Gough. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

gough coat of arms

Gough Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Gough blazon are the boar and stag’s head. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and sable.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits! 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

Gough Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Gough Name

Gough Origin:
England

Origins of Gough:
Listed in many spellings including Gough, Goff, Goffe, Goth, Gouth, and unusual dialects such as Coath and Couth, this interesting surname is usually English when listed in England.  It has two known origins.  The first is professional from the Cornish word and Breton word “goff” meaning a Smith.  This form may have been introduced into England by the supporters of William the Champion after the Invasion of 1066.  Professional surnames originally only became hereditary when a son, or possibly a grandson, followed his father into the same line of business.  The second possible origin is Welsh from the old word “coch” meaning red.  As such it was probably given as an ethnic nickname to an Anglo-Saxon, as many of these people had red hair or a red complexion.  Sometimes the initial “g” was exchanged with “c,” but this may put down to poor reading and writing, as well as strong languages.  Early examples of records from church records of the city of London include the wedding of Elizabeth Gough and Rychard Walker in February 1549, at St. Michael’s Bassishaw and the christening of Elizabeth Coath, the daughter of Richard Coath, at Wandsworth, in December 1653.

Variations:
More common variations are: Goughe, Gougha, Gaugh, Cough, Gouph, Goufh, Gaughy, Gaughe, Coughi, Gaugha.

England:
The surname Gough first appeared in Radnorshire (Welsh: Sir Faesyfed), an old historic district of mid- Wales, anciently part of the kingdom of Powys, where they held a family seat from very early times.  Some say well before the Norman Invasion and the arrival of Duke William at Hastings in 1066 AD.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Griffin Gogh, dated 1287, in the Assize Court of the county of Cheshire. It was during the reign of King Edward, who was known as “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.  Surnames all over the country began to develop with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Ireland:
Many of the people with surname Gough had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Gough landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th.  Some of the people with the name Gough who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Mathew Gough settled in Virginia in 1635.  Mathew Gough, who landed in Virginia in 1639.  People with the surname Gough who landed in the United States in the 18th century included William, Gough In, who arrived in Georgia in 1733.  The following century saw much more Gough surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Gough who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Miss Gough, who landed in New York, NY in 1817.

Canada:
People with the surname Gough who landed in the Canada in the 18th century included Martin Gough, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750.  Mary Gough, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1750. The following century saw much more Gough surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Gough who came in the Canada in the 19th century included Philip Gough, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1833.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Gough who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Charles Gough, English convict from Bristol, who moved aboard the “Adamant” in March 1821, settling in New South Wales, Australia.  Sophia Gough, English criminal from Worcester, who moved aboard the “Amphitrite” in August 1833, settling in New South Wales, Australia.  Ann Gough, English convict from Lancaster, who was transported aboard the “Arab” in December 1835, settling in Van Diemen’s Land, Australia.

New-Zealand:
Some of the population with the surname Gough who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Timothy Gough landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840.  Marjory Gough at the age of 22, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “London” in 1840.  Timothy Gough at the age of 36, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “London” in 1840.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Gough:
England 12,820; United States 10,474; Australia 4,610; Canada 2,718; South Africa 2,667; Wales 1,321; Ireland 1,310; Honduras 888; New Zealand 812; Scotland 696.

Notable People:
Ian Gough (b. 1976), was a Welsh rugby union football player.
Brigadier Guy Francis Gough (1893-1988), was a British Commanding Officer Advance Base 1st Army, North Africa.
Brigadier William George Hugh Gough (1897-1948), was a British Commanding Officer 50th Indian Parachute Brigade, India.

Gough Family Gift Ideas

Browse Gough family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More gough Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Viscount Gough). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. on a mount vert a lion pass. guard. or, supporting with the dexter paw the union flag ppr. and over the same, in chief, the words “ China, India,” in letters of gold; 2nd and 3rd, az. on a fesse ar. betw. three boars’ heads couped or, a lion pass. gu. (being his family arms), in the centre chief point, pendent from a riband ar. fimbriated az. a representation of the badge of the Spanish Order of Charles III. ppr. and on a chief a representation of the east wall of the fortress of Tarifa, with a breach betw. two turrets, and on the dexter turret the British flag flying also ppr. Crests—In the centre, on a wreath, a boar’s head couped at the neck or; on the dexter side, on a mural crown ar. a lion pass. guard. or, holding in the dexter paw two flag-staves in bend sinister ppr. the one bearing the union-flag of Great Britain and Ireland, surmounting the other, the staff thereof broken, with a triangular banner flowing therefrom, being intended to represent a Chinese flag, having thereon the device of a dragon, in an escroll, above the word “China;” on the sinister side, on a wreath, a dexter arm embowed, in the uniform of the 87th regiment, being gu. faced vert, the hand grasping the colour of the said regiment displ. and a representation of a French eagle reversed and depressed, the staff broken ppr. in an escroll above the word “Barrosa". Supporters—On the dexter side a lion reguard. or, gorged with an eastern crown gu. with chain reflexed over the back gold, the rim of the crown inscribed “Punjab ” in letters also gold; on the sinister side a dragon (intended to represent the device upon a Chinese flag, granted to Viscount Gough in the crest of honourable augmentation) or, gorged with a mural crown sa. inscribed with the word “China,” and chained gold. Mottoes—Over the family crest, “Faugh a Ballagh;” over the first crest, “China;” and over the third, “Barrosa;” under the arms, “Goojerat."
2) (Bristol, co. Gloucester, cos. Radnor and Somerset). Ar. three boars' heads couped sa. armed or.
3) (Oldfallings and Perry Hall, co. Stafford). Motto—Domat omnia virtus. (exemplified, 1845, to the Hon. Frederick Gough-Calthorpe, on his taking the surname and arms of Gough only. The licence extended to his issue). Gu. on a fesse ar. betw. three boars’ beads couped or, a lion pass. az. Crest—A boar’s head couped ar. devouring a broken spear gu.
4) (Marshe, co. Salop). Sa. three nags’ heads erased ar.
5) (Meriatt, co. Somerset). Gu. on a fesse or, betw. three boars’ heads couped ar. a lion pass. of the field. Crest—A boar’s head couped at the neck ar.
6) (co. Warwick). Chequy or and az. a fesse erm.
7) (co. Lincoln, 1640, and Wales). Az. three boars pass. ar. two and one.
8) Ar. on a chev. gu. three lions pass. guard. or.
9) (Ireland; Garrett Gough, settled in Ireland, 1530, Reg. Ulster’s Office, by Carney, Ulster). (Kilmanahan, co. Waterford; allowed by Hawkins, Ulster, 1717). (Ballyorley, co. Wexford; Clement Gough, Esq., of Ballyorley, temp. William III., descended from the preceding, m. Mary, dau. of Rickard Donovan, of Clonmore, same co.). Az. a chev. betw. two fleurs-de-lis in chief and a lion ramp. in base or. Crest—A wyvern, tail nowed ppr.
10) (granted, 1816, to George Gough, Esq., of Woodstown, co. Limerick; descended from Right Rev. Francis Gough, Bishop of Limerick). Az. on a fess ar. betw. three boars’ heads couped or, a lion pass. gu. Crest—A boar’s head couped at the neck or, tusked ar. Motto—Gradu diverso via una.
11) (or Gough). (Sir James Goghe, knighted by Sir George Carey, Lord Deputy, 29 Sept. 1603). Az. a chev. betw. two fleurs-de-lis in chief and a lion ramp. in base or.
12) Az. a boar ar.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30