Gould Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Gould Family Coat of Arms

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Gould Coat of Arms Meaning

Gould Name Origin & History

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Gould Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Gould blazon are the lion rampant, per saltire and scroll. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

To add variety and interest to the arms, heraldic artists began to divide the background of the shield into two parts, giving each a different colour. They were named for the ordinary that they most resembled, so the division of the shield by opposing diagonal lines, similar to the ordinary known as the saltire came to be called per saltire 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P63. Visually rather striking, it became popular and artists added decorative effects to the partition line to distinguish otherwise very similar coats of arms. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Party.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The parchment is a typical example of this. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 The parchment may be rolled or have words written upon it.The Scroll may appear similarly.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Gould Name

Gould Origin:

England

Origins of Name:

The surname of Gould is of an Anglo-Saxon origin, with two possible sources. The first of these sources is that the Gould surname is derived from a personal name or nickname, derived from the Old English word “Golde”. Golde is the femine form of the name. And also from the Old English word “Golda” which is a masculine name. They both translate to mean gold. This name was often given to someone who had golden hair, or perhaps was sometimes given to a precious person, or someone with intrinsic value. The second possible origin of this surname of Gould is that the names of Gould, Gold, or Goult were given to someone who worked in gold, such as a jeweler, refiner, or gilder. This is an occupational surname, which is also derived from the Old English “golda” or “golde” and used for a different purpose.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Gold, Goold, Goulde, Gouldy, Gouled, Ghould, Gouild, Gouldh, Goulda, Gouldd, Goulad

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Gould was found in the Pipe Rolls of Devonshire in the year 1165, as one Walter Gold. The Pipe Rolls were under the direction of King Henry II, who was known as “The Builder of Churches” and reigned from the year 1154 to the year 1189. In the Doomsday Book of 1086, one named Hugo filius Golde was recorded, and in the 1193 Pipe Rolls of Bedfordshire, Ralph filius Golde was listed. As a reminder, the Doomsday Book of 1086 was said to contain the “Great Survey” of England. This surname of Gould is found all over the counties of England and Wales. In England, the places with the highest concentrations of those who bear the surname of Gould are the counties of Wiltshire, Staffordshire, Derbyshire, Essex, Somerset, Devon, Hampshire, Lancashire, Yorkshire, Cheshire, Dorset, and the city of London.

Scotland:

In Scotland, those who carry the surname of Gould are established in the entire country. The counties that have the larger populations of those with the surname of Gould are Angus, Aberdeenshire, Fife, Midlothian, and Lanarkshire.

Ireland

The Irish version of the name Gould has been Goold. The first known ancestor of this name in Ireland is William Goold. He is believed to possibly be Anglo-Norman origin. He was the mayor of Cork in 1443. For generations after the family would be landowners and merchants in the town. By the late 1800s the line would cease abrubtly when James Goold would leave for Australia, and Vere Goold was tried and convicted in a famous murder case.

United States:

In the 1600’s European citizens began to leave their home country in search of a new and better life. The United States of America, which at that time was referred to as the New World, was filled with promises of religious freedom, new and interesting jobs, land with no owner, and better overall living conditions. Thus, America was a high destination during the European Migration. The first person who landed in America and was recorded to have the surname of Gould, was as man named Nathaniell Gould, who settled in the state of Virginia in the year 1620. Closely following him was Peter Gould, who also landed in the state of Virginia, but two years later, in 1622. Thirteen years later, Jarvice Gould, John Gould, and Edward Gould sailed on the ship named the “Elizabeth” from London. England, to Boston, Massachusetts, in the year 1635. Those people in the United States of America who carry the surname of Gould are congregated in very high concentrations in the states od Maine, Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, New Hampshire, Vermont, Ohio, and Pennsylvania. However, by the time the 20th Century rolled around, those who were identified with the surname of Gould were found mostly in the state of New York.

Gould Today:

United States 47,213

England 16,391

Canada 7,180

Australia 6,384

South Africa 2,776

New Zealand 1,380

Wales 1,106

Scotland 801

France 502

Argentina 403

Notable People:

David Gould (1943-1988) who was a college professor from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, who flew aboard the Pan Am Flight 103 from Frankfurt to Detroit, which was known as the Lockerbie Bombing in 1988, and died

George Jay Gould (1864-1923) who was the President of the Denver and Rio Grande Western Railroad and the Western Pacific Railroad

Chester Gould (1900-1985) who was the cartoonist and creator of the Dick Tracy comic strip

Morton Gould (1913-1996) who was a composer, conductor, arranger and pianist from America who was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Music in 1995

Gordon Gould (1920-2005) who was a physicist from America credited with the invention of the laser

Elliott Gould (born in 1938) who was an actor from America, played Trapper John in M*A*S*H

Laurence McKinley Gould (1896-1995) who was a geologist, educator, and polar explorer from America

Mr. Richard Gould (died in 1915) who worked aboard the RMS Lusitania as a Senior Boilermaker from Bootle, Lancashire, England, and died in the sinking of the Lusitania in 1915

Gould Family Gift Ideas

Browse Gould family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Frome Bellett and Frampton, co. Glamorgan). Motto—Non nobis esti. Per saltire or and az. a lion ramp. counterchanged. Cresi— An arm embowed, vested gu. cuffed or, holding in the hand ppr. a banner paly of six az. and gold, on a canton ar. a cross of the first, the staff also gold.
2) (Exeter, temp. Edward III.; Combe in Staverton, temp. Elizabeth, and afterwards of Hayes and Downes, co. Devon; the elder branch became extinct at the decease of William Gould, Esq., in 1726; his co-heirs m. Buller and Tuckfield; a younger branch was of Lew Trenchard). Per saltire az. and or, a lion ramp. counterchanged. Crest—A demi lion ramp. bezantee.
3) (Lew Trenchard, co. Devon; the last male heir, Edward Gould, Esq., of that place, d. in 1788, leaving a sister and heiress, Margaret, wife of Charles Baring, Esq.). Motto—Probitate et labore. Per saltire or and az. a lion ramp. counterchanged, for Gould, quartering Baring. Crest—A demi lion ramp. az. bezantee.
4) (Dorchester and Edmonton, co. Middlesex). Per saltire az. and or, a lion ramp. counterchanged. Crest—An arm vested vert, holding in the hand ppr. a banner or, charged with three bars wavy az. on a canton ar. a rose gu.
5) (Fleet House, co. Dorset). Same Arms. Crest—An arm embowed, vested gu. cuff or, holding in the hand ppr. a banner paly of six az. and of the second, on a canton ar. a cross of the first, the staff gold.
6) (Upwey, co. Dorset; exemplified to Hamilton Llewellyn Jackson, eldest surviving son of Thomas Jackson, Esq., of Fanningstown, co. Limerick, and grandson of Thomas Jackson, Esq., of same place, by Barbaba Gould, his wife, dau. of William Read, Esq., of Bradford, co. Wilts, and Barbara, his wife, sister and heiress of James Gould, Esq., of Upwey, upon his assuming, by royal licence, 1871, the name of Gould in place of Jackson). Motto—Revirescat. (Admiral Sir Davidge Gould, G.C.B.). Motto—A Nilo Victoria. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, per saltire az. and or, a lion ramp. counterchanged, for Gould; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a greyhound courant ermines betw. three eagles’ heads erased sa., for Jackson. Crest—An arm embowed vested vert, holding in the hand a flagstaff ppr. therefrom flowing a banner or, charged with three barrulets wavy az. on a canton ar. a cross gu.
7) Az. a lion ramp. or, betw. three scrolls ar. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or, holding a scroll ar.
8) Paly of six ar. and sa. six crosses crosslet or.
9) (Ireland). Or, a lion ramp. gu. Crest—A martlet or.
10) 0 Ar. a fess sa. betw. three goldfinches in chief vert and a cinquefoil in base of the last pierced or.
11) (Scotland). Ar. a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped gu. Crest—Within the horns of a crescent ar. a buckle or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P63
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Party
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100