Grange Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Grange Family Coat of Arms

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Grange Coat of Arms Meaning

Grange Name Origin & History

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Grange Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Grange blazon are the antelope and griffin. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and sable.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The ibex or antelope was drawn by heraldic artists in rather more fearsome aspect than its real-life appearance, with large horns, mane and a long tail. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope These days we regard the ibex as being a member of the goat family rather than an antelope, but in the middle ages there were was no real distinction between these animals. They could adopt many of the poses of the lion, such as rampant and statant. 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]11Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Grange Name

Grange Origin:

England, France

Origins of Grange:

This name, with different spelling forms like Grange, Grangier, and Grancher, is of French and English geographic origin for a person who resided near a granary. The origin is from the Anglo – French “graunge” itself coming from the Olde French “Grange,” which means a granary or shelter. The surname was first noted in the second half of the 13th Century. One, Laurence atte Grange appears in the 1296 ‘Premium Rolls of Sussex” and a Johannes del Grange in the 1379 ‘Census Tax Returns Records of Yorkshire”. In October 1547, Elizabeth Graunge and Rychard Turner was married in St. Margaret’s, Westminster, and in January 1566 Grace Grainge and Paul Rytche married in London. Cristopher Grainge and Alice Gregorie, both married in St. Mary at Hill, London, in February 1592.

Variations:

More common variations are: Grainge, Garange, Grangie, Gorange, Grangey, Gurange, Griange, Granage, Granige, Gorrange.

England:

The origins of the surname Grange appeared in Cheshire where people held a family seat from early times. Some say better before the invasion of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de la Graunge, dated about 1275, in the “Hundred Rolls of Essex.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Grange had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Grange landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Grange who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Grange settled in Virginia in 1635. William Grange settled in Barbados in 1654. Arnoldus DeLa Grange, who landed in Maryland in 1666-1750. John Grange, who arrived in Maryland in 1667. Matthew Grange, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1682.

People with the surname Grange who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Elizabeth Grange and Francoise Grange, both landed in Maryland in the same year 1763. Jean-Baptiste Grange and Anastazie Grange also landed in Maryland in the same year 1763. Maturain Grange at the age of 18, arrived in South Carolina in 1763.

The following century saw more Grange surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Grange who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included William Grange, who landed in New York in 1830. William Grange came to Pennsylvania in 1847.

Canada:

People with the surname Grange who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Thomas Grange, who arrived in Nova Scotia in 1749.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Grange who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Edward Grange, an English criminal from London, who moved shipped the “Anson” in September 1843, settling in Van Diemen‘s Land, Australia. Christopher Grange arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Spartan” in 1849.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Grange who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Jerome Grange came to Nelson aboard the ship “London” in 1842. William Grange and Thomas Grange, both arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the same ship “Andrew Jackson” in the same year 1865. Auguste Grange arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Rooparell” in 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Grange: France 11,940; South Africa 3,324; England 2,570; United States 2,127; Switzerland 639; Cameroon 496; Australia 447; Paraguay 397; Brazil 318; Canada 277.

Notable People:

Harold Edward “Red” Grange, (June 1903–January 1991) was a college and professional NFL halfback for the University of Illinois, and the Chicago Bears.

Grange Family Gift Ideas

Browse Grange family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Notes: (Bulbeck, co. Cambridge, and Swaffham, co. Norfolk). Blazon: Per saltire or and sa. four griffins’ heads erased counterchanged. Crest—A demi antelope or, attired, maned, armed and hoofed sa.
2) Notes: (co. Warwick). Blazon: Same Arms, a bordure az.
3) Notes: (London). Blazon: Gu. a pomegranate or. Crest—A lion’s gamb erect and erased ppr. holding a bunch of pomegranates or.
4) Notes: (Wolsingham, co. Chester, Bishops Auckland, co. Durham, and London; John Grange, of the latter. Visit. 1568). Blazon: Az. a chev. betw. three lions ramp. or, on a chief of the last as many escallops gu. a border compony of the second and last. Crest—A griffin’s head erased sa. beaked and eared or, charged with three bezants.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Antelope
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P210
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
11. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150